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On the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia, UGA doctoral student Bruno Casamali is testing different irrigation methods and fertilization rates to give Georgia growers advice on how to grow peaches more efficiently. CAES News
Peach Research
Two years into the job, University of Georgia peach specialist Dario Chavez is pleased with the development of his research program. The new research peach orchard in Griffin, Georgia, is filled with over 130 different peach tree varieties, several newly grafted potential varieties and a host of trees for irrigation and fertilization studies, all in an effort to help growers of the crop that gave Georgia its nickname — the “Peach State.”
University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling. CAES News
Battling Blotch
Georgia farmers struggle to control bacterial fruit blotch (BFB), but University of Georgia plant pathologists have discovered that naturally occurring bacteria can combat the disease.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
Edible Landscaping
The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness CAES News
Tomato Growing Tips
Whether or not you are trying to grow tomatoes for the first time, or if your a vegetable garden veteran, following some tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is sure to make your harvest plentiful.
Homemade fruit roll-ups can easily be made a home with the help of a food dehydrator or oven. CAES News
Homemade Fruit Roll-Ups
If winter weather is keeping your family indoors, use the time to make and enjoy homemade fruit roll-ups. Using a food dehydrator and directions from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, you can make some simple fruit roll-up snacks that are lower in sugar than those that are commercially produced.
Members of Stanley Culpepper's team conducts a trial that is comparing methyl bromide to Paladin Pic, Trifecta, and the UGA 3-WAY. CAES News
Drift Complaints
Complaints over off-target movement of chemical applications went down 48 percent from 2014 to 2015, but Georgia farmers must better understand the factors that influence drift, according to University of Georgia weed scientist Stanley Culpepper.
Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.
The most common species of fruit fly has red/orange eyes, but not all fruit flies have red/orange eyes. Fruit flies, typically just an eighth of an inch in size, often hover around and just above food (most often decomposing vegetable matter) prior to landing.

Habits: Feed mainly on decaying vegetable matter, compost, rotting fruit, etc. Often found around salad bars and restaurants where vegetable matter and juices collect. Also called vinegar flies, since vinegar (acetic acid) is a decomposition product of some rotting vegetable matter.

Interventions: Find larval fly feeding site(s) and clean or otherwise throw away rotting fruit or vegetable matter. Remove garbage, including the plastic liner, and other refuse at least twice per week.

Might Be Confused With: humpbacked flies, fungus gnats, moth flies. CAES News
Fruit Flies
Fruit flies can be a problem year-round, but are especially common during late summer and fall because they are attracted to ripe or fermenting fruits and vegetables. The best way to avoid problems with fruit flies is to eliminate sources of attraction.