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Browse Fruit Stories - Page 9

79 results found for Fruit
Pansies come in a wide variety of colors - and shades, like this tricolor variety that has two colors along with its face color. CAES News
Edible ornamentals
Vegetables don’t have to just grow in gardens. Many can be part of your landscape, offering both color and aesthetic value and providing food.
Georgia Master Gardener Marion Stapp holds a handful of blackberries grown at the University of Georgia Bamboo Farm and Coastal Garden in Savannah, Ga. CAES News
Homegrown berries
Homeowners looking to add something new to their landscapes this spring should consider something edible. A University of Georgia small fruits expert suggests berries as a delicious and easy addition.
Spring is right around the corner, and so are spring flowers, summer vegetables and all the gardening these seasons bring. CAES News
2011 edition of the Spring Garden Packet
Summertime is right around the corner, and with it comes colorful flowers, tasty vegetables and leaf-chopping insects. We’re got articles and information to help you with your garden needs in the 36th edition of the Spring Garden Packet, produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
CAES News
Buy trees and help local food group
Home gardeners, or would-be ones, can start the year off right by purchasing and planting a fruit tree, vine or bush.
As interest in local food continues to grow, more communities across Georgia have started farmers markets, like this one in Roswell. The University of Georgia's helping to meet the demand, too, with a certificate program in local food systems. CAES News
Local food systems
The University of Georgia hopes to bring gardening, fresh produce and nutritious food a little closer to the people who need it by first educating its students.
Bacterial leaf scorch, caused by the bacterium Xyella fastidiosa, causes what looks like burns on the blueberry leaves. CAES News
Blueberry disease
Blueberries passed peaches as the state’s top moneymaking fruit a few years ago, worth more than $100 million on the farm annually. But new diseases threaten to hamper its rise, says a University of Georgia fruit specialist.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
New berrry bred for home gardens
For years, University of Georgia plant breeder Scott NeSmith has created new blueberry varieties for the commercial market. Now, he has bred one just for home gardeners.