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Browse Water Use Stories - Page 7

65 results found for Water Use
CAES News
Gardening 101
A University of Georgia horticulture expert will teach Gardening 101 on April 5 at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia in Athens, Ga.
CAES News
Drowning plants
With all of the rain Georgia has gotten this winter, it’s easy to forget the state was ever in extreme drought. But just because the drought is over doesn’t mean water conservation practices should stop. Too much water can be just as bad as not enough for plants.
Uneven watering can cause fruit split, as can a combination of low temperature and slow to fast growth due to changing environmental conditions and increased nitrogen application. Split starts small, getting progressively larger as fruit size increases. CAES News
Veggie problems
There is nothing more frustrating than planting a vegetable garden and not producing a substantial crop. Numerous problems can contribute to low yields, but, fortunately, most of them can be avoided.
CAES News
Gardening how-to help
If you’re looking for reliable, up-to-date, free information about how to landscape your lawn this spring, which ornamentals, vegetables, native species or herbs to plant or how to compost and mulch, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension likely has a publication that will answer your questions.
Butterfly Weed is a native herbaceous perennial that attracts butterflies like magnets with its florescent orange blooms. CAES News
Spring gardening
Welcome to the 35th annual Spring Garden Packet from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Written by CAES faculty, editors and graduate and undergraduate students, these articles are provided to help you with timely, valuable statewide gardening information.
Photo of a rain garden taken by North Carolina Cooperative Extension personnel. CAES News
It's raining, it's pouring
It’s raining in Georgia, and it doesn’t seem like it’s going to stop. Instead of the drought levels and watering restrictions of years past, Georgians are now dealing with a yard-flooding abundance of rainfall.
CAES News
Landscape Update
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold the 2010 landscape updates and trainings January 15 and February 26 in Perry. The trainings will cover weed and insect control, soil compaction and thatch, small engine maintenance, cost management and pesticide recertification credits.
CAES News
Rain record
Tropical Storm Ida brought more wet days to Georgia in November, setting rainfall records in what is normally a dry month.
Horticulture graduate student Jongyun Kim checks on a plant's soil moisture sensor in UGA horticulture professor Marc van Iersel's greenhouse. CAES News
Save water, save money
Many ornamental nursery growers test to see if their plants need water by sticking a finger in the soil to see if it’s dry. Or, they just water them whether they need it or not. University of Georgia horticulturists have found a better way, one that requires less water, less fertilizer, less money and fewer dirty fingers.