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65 results found for Water Use
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Tomato leaf roll
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, like myself, are getting several phone calls about the leaves on homegrown tomato plants curling and rolling inward. Curling or rolling of tomato leaves can be caused by various factors including environmental stresses, a virus or herbicide damage.
Container garden including several different plants CAES News
Hot weather stress
When the temperatures reach triple digits, we hear plenty on the news about how to take care of our pets and ourselves, but not much about our plants. Recent record temperatures can obliterate our lawns and ornamentals in just a few hours if these plants are already under stress for other reasons.
Plants love the summer sun, but June's triple-digit days had plants, and their caretakers, wilting across the state. CAES News
Too hot for plants
When temperatures start heading into 3-digit territory, even the most sun-loving plants can start suffering from the effects of Georgia’s mid-summer sauna.
Cooperative Extension Southwest District 4-H'ers play beneath center pivot irrigation at the 2012 4-H20 camp at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Ga. CAES News
South Georgia 4-H'ers have fun learning about water conservation.
Dozens of 4-H students playing under the dangling spray nozzle of a center pivot irrigation system may look like a fun way to cool off in the south Georgia heat. But it’s also a lesson in water conservation.
Tomatoes are the stars of many home gardens. CAES News
Backyard tomato tactics
Few things in the garden seem to cause as much joy, heartbreak or anxiety as the fate of the summer’s backyard tomato harvest.
A push lawn mower CAES News
Turfgrass battle plan
Are you dreaming of lush, green grass for your lawn? There are several steps you can take now, in the cold of winter, to help you enjoy a beautiful lawn in the summer.
Drip irrigation helps to keep soil and water from splashing on plants leaves, which helps cut down on plant disease. CAES News
Plant diseases
Beautiful plants often don’t live up to their potential. Getting to the root of problems like disease and wilt sometimes starts with a look in the mirror, says University of Georgia experts.
Mark Risse, left, and Adam Speir check out the compost piles at the University of Georgia. Risse and Speir are faculty in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. CAES News
Water survey
More people value water quality over water quantity, according to a recent survey conducted by University of Georgia researchers. And, they trust local water information sources over federal ones.
"Your Southern Garden" host Walter Reeves. CAES News
Your Southern Garden
Propagating from stem cuttings, changing hydrangea colors and building a hydroponic garden are featured on "Your Southern Garden" with Walter Reeves April 23 at noon and 6:30 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting.