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65 results found for Water Use
Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H program assistant, speaks to a group of 4-H students at the 4-H20 camp on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. CAES News
4-H20 Camp
South Georgia 4-H members learned the importance of water conservation during the 4-H20 Camp’s stop at the University of Georgia’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) in Camilla, Georgia, on Wednesday, June 14.
Drip irrigation helps to keep soil and water from splashing on plants leaves, which helps cut down on plant disease. CAES News
Garden Irrigation
Many homeowners have a substantial investment in the various trees, shrubs and annuals in their landscape. Trying to keep these prized plants watered can sometimes be a challenge, especially in times of drought.
Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Watering Tips
Keeping landscape plants alive during the current drought conditions in Georgia takes some forethought, but it’s not impossible or illegal with these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Urban Ag Council.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Watering Rules
Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. Some 110 Georgia counties are suffering from drought conditions, but both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.
CAES News
Soaker Hoses
During long periods without rain, landscape plants and trees can suffer permanent damage. Supplying water slowly and gradually from below is the best way to help them survive, as this method has much less potential for evaporation than overhead irrigation.
Jim Robbins, University of Arkansas, will present on using unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs or drones, in "Drones in Production – Inventory Management and Stress Detection" at UGA Extension's Academy of Plant Production, June 12-15 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Green Industry Association are inviting veteran nursery and greenhouse growers to “get nerdy” with them this summer at the inaugural Academy of Crop Production, June 12-15 at Hotel Indigo in Athens, Georgia.
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness CAES News
Tomato Growing Tips
Whether or not you are trying to grow tomatoes for the first time, or if your a vegetable garden veteran, following some tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is sure to make your harvest plentiful.
A pair of sunburnt watermelons sit in a field in Tift County. CAES News
Georgia Watermelons
High summer temperatures and intense sun could reduce Georgia's end-of-season watermelon production this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong. Because of the increased heat over the past week, risk of sunburn for watermelons in the field has been high. If watermelons do scald, they may not be marketable, which may reduce farmers’ normal timeframe for selling their crop.
CAES News
Tropical Storms
Tropical storms may cause havoc for coastal homeowners, but the rainfall they bring recharges the water balance and keeps soil moist in the summer, according to University of Georgia climatologist Pam Knox. Lack of tropical storm activity in 2014 contributed to Georgia’s prolonged drought, she said.