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84 results found for Perennials
This clump of Romano Dutch iris was planted almost 20 years ago in Savannah. CAES News
Dutch Iris
The Dutch iris is relatively trouble-free and should bloom in May and June. Most references suggest a cold hardiness of zones 6 through 9, but gardeners tout a return in zone 5 when a protective layer of mulch has been added. They need plenty of sun to bloom their best, though a little afternoon shade would be tolerated.
'Ice Follies' daffodils return faithfully each year to the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
Early Risers
With the arrival of the narcissus, the first hint of spring is trumpeting, so to speak, in the South.
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture. CAES News
Hometown Tea
Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby.
Primulas offer unbelievable color during a dreary time of the year. CAES News
Fake Flowers
“Primula” comes from the Latin word meaning “first of spring.” With 400 species of primulas to choose from, pick one and enjoy some 14 weeks of unimaginable color that no other plant can match.
The golden-colored 'Caramel' and rust-colored 'Lava Lamp' are two hybrids of Heuchera villosa growing in the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah. CAES News
Coral Bells
Coral bells deserve a place in the sun, partial shade or shade. Plant them along woodland trails, in front of shrubs or partner them with wood fern or autumn fern or even hostas. Gardeners in the South must try them as a sunny, cool-season component plant.
Lamiums reach a height of 8 to 12 inches with a spread of 24 inches, making them a perfect spiller plant in mixed containers. CAES News
Deadnettle's Not Dead
January is typically a self-induced holding pattern when it comes to gardening. But if you find that you failed to get cool-season containers planted, then take advantage of fresh shipments of pansies, violas, petunias, dianthus and all the other component plants, like lamiums, as they arrive at your garden center.
Known as “Euphorbia x martinii,” 'Ascot Rainbow' is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. CAES News
Garden Royalty
Botanically speaking, ‘Ascot Rainbow’ is known as “Euphorbia x martinii.” It is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. In truth, it is known as a spurge, which we most often associate with a host of terrible weeds. ‘Ascot Rainbow,’ however, is worthy of garden royalty.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer. CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of those plants become Classic City Garden Award winners.