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CAES News
Ag Awareness
The University of Georgia Tifton Campus will welcome around 500 fourth-graders during Agriculture and Environmental Awareness Day on Tuesday, Oct. 25.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
To Overseed or Not?
While drivers spend extra time in the car in search of fuel during the recent gasoline shortage, farmers are dealing with a more long-term shortage — a low supply of hay for their livestock.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Crop
Expectations are high for this year’s Georgia pecan crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Corn is harvested on the UGA Tifton Campus on August 11, 2016. CAES News
Corn Production
Georgia’s field corn acreage is up and yields should be strong, but prices remain disappointingly low for producers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko.
A field of dryland peanuts in Tift County. CAES News
Dryland Peanuts
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort advises Georgia’s peanut growers to take action to protect their dryland crop.
Parts of north Georgia received between 10 and 15 inches of rain during August. CAES News
August Climate
Rainfall in August reduced the area of extreme drought in northern Georgia. However, abnormally dry conditions and drought expanded in central and south Georgia, especially in coastal areas.
Pictured is the top of a tree destroyed from lightning in Lenox, Georgia. Chunks of wood from the tree were found almost 100 yards away. CAES News
Lightning Strikes
Lightning strikes are unpredictable and deadly. Lightning and floods are the two biggest causes of weather-related fatalities in the country, according to University of Georgia climatologist Pam Knox, who urges Georgians to pay attention to the signs of sudden storms.
Pictured is a comparison between healthy peanuts and those infected with white mold disease. CAES News
White Mold Disease
Harvest time may be less than a month away for many Georgia peanut farmers, but University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait insists there is still time to treat the crop for white mold disease.