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28 results found for Nursery
Plumbago forms a loose shrub in the landscape when kept at about 3-feet tall. CAES News
Cape Plumbago
Growing cape plumbago is like having your own ticket to the butterfly wild kingdom. Not only will you be the proprietor of the daily nectar café, but depending on where you live, you will also celebrate young ones, as this is a host plant for the cassius blue butterfly.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
When transplanting a tree, dig the new hole 50 percent wider than the soil ball to loosen the surrounding soil and ensure good root establishment. The root system should be at the same depth it was before it was moved. CAES News
Protect Bare Roots
Landscape planting season is upon us and home gardeners may be eager to buy new fruit trees and ornamentals. New plant material is often produced bare root — without soil — and must be either kept in cold storage or temporarily planted outdoors to survive.
Four University of Georgia Extension agents worked together to present Green University, a training for professionals in the green industry. The agents were (top, l-r) Keith Mickler, Rolando Orellana, (bottom, l-r) Mary Carol Sheffield and Paul Pugliese. CAES News
Green University
Four University of Georgia Extension agents have been collectively awarded this year’s Urban Agriculture Education Award from the Georgia Urban Ag Council, a statewide association for professionals involved in all sectors of the urban agriculture industry.
Ice covers plants outside the University of Georgia Extension office in Thomas County after the winter storm on Jan. 28, 2014. CAES News
Don't Prune Yet
A hard freeze sure can make landscapes look bad. The best advice for now is the “wait and see approach.” Give the plants time to recover, oh let’s say, until spring. No good will be done from pruning away what you think is dead; it may still be alive.
CAES News
Plant Propagators Meeting
The University of Georgia Department of Horticulture will host hundreds of nursery operators, ornamental plant breeders, landscape designers and plant scientists Nov. 2-6 at the International Plant Propagators’ Society Southern Region of North America Annual Meeting.
UGA professor of horticulture John Ruter, who took over the garden July 1, 2013, wants to emphasize the gardens educational, research and public outreach missions. CAES News
Ruter to lead Trial Gardens
After 30 years, the Trial Gardens at UGA — that green, flower-laden oasis sandwiched between the Snelling Dining Hall and the College of Pharmacy — is being tended by a new green thumb.
Camellias add both green shrubby and color to landscapes with their leaves and blooms. CAES News
New plants
Fall and winter are the best times for Georgians to add new trees, shrubs and bushes to their landscapes.