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159 results found for Urban Agriculture
The garden at the Scott Site at Rock Eagle 4-H Center produces between 500 and 2,000 pounds. This garden staff is hoping to collect heirloom seeds from middle Georgia gardeners to make next year's crop more-resilient and historically accurate. CAES News
Local Veggies
Nothing could be more local –or make you more of a locavore – than eating locally grown produce that comes from your own garden plot. You may be thinking that you don’t have room for a garden, but I assure you that the vegetable garden has become “sweet ‘n’ neat” over the past few years for a couple of reasons.
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture. CAES News
Hometown Tea
Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby.
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9. CAES News
Organics Conference
More than 1,000 farmers, gardeners, health advocates and organic food lovers are expected to attend the 2017 Georgia Organics Conference and Expo. This year’s schedule includes farm tours, 10 in-depth workshops, 32 educational sessions, three daylong intensive workshops, two keynote addresses, one-on-one consulting sessions and a trade show. Registration ends on Monday, Feb. 6, for this year’s conference. The two-day annual event, one of the largest sustainable agriculture expos in the South, is set for Feb. 17-18 at the Georgia International Convention Center in Atlanta.
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Vegetable Workshop
A workshop for small-scale vegetable farmers is set for Tuesday, Feb. 28, on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. The workshop is designed for seasoned growers who want to enhance their operation and for small-acreage farmers interested in marketing vegetables. Homeowners who face challenges growing vegetables are also welcome to attend.
Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade. CAES News
Plant Destroyers
As counties across Georgia continue to develop, wildlife habitats are disturbed and destroyed. This drives deer, and other wildlife, into home landscapes, where they feast on plants. Deterring them can be a challenge.
Mixed containers featuring trailing pansies and dianthus make this Old Town patio in Columbus, Georgia, a cool season delight. CAES News
Pansy Partners
Trailing foliage and flowers are equally paramount to designing mixed baskets and containers in the cool season. Throughout the Old Town community in Columbus, Georgia, container gardens make colorful statements.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.
Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Watering Tips
Keeping landscape plants alive during the current drought conditions in Georgia takes some forethought, but it’s not impossible or illegal with these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Urban Ag Council.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Watering Rules
Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. Some 110 Georgia counties are suffering from drought conditions, but both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.