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Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Watering Tips
Keeping landscape plants alive during the current drought conditions in Georgia takes some forethought, but it’s not impossible or illegal with these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Urban Ag Council.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Watering Rules
Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. Some 110 Georgia counties are suffering from drought conditions, but both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.
The 'Taishan Orange' marigold makes the perfect fall container plant, especially when it's combined with 'Trusty Rusty' coleus and 'Can-Can' calibrachoa. CAES News
Mari-mums
Mari-mums are large-flower marigolds, known botanically as Tagetes erecta, that are reminiscent of chrysanthemums. Many of them really look like the old-fashioned homecoming mums of the ‘50s and ‘60s, only smaller.
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer. CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of those plants become Classic City Garden Award winners.
David Jespersen is the newest member of the University of Georgia Turfgrass Team. CAES News
New Turf Researcher
New Jersey native David Jespersen was selected to fill retired UGA turfgrass physiologist Bob Carrow’s position based in part on his research on the effects of heat stress on creeping bentgrass. Jespersen is adjusting to life in the South and to working on a small extended university campus.
University of Georgia horticulturist Carol Robacker has released 'Raspberry Profusion,' a cultivar that blooms heavily from May to September. Its raspberry-colored sepals, wonderful fragrance and foliage is more spectacular than older varieties. CAES News
Foundation Plants
What makes a good foundation plant for your home landscape? Any plant that can tolerate extreme heat, highly compact soil and a highly alkaline soil pH is a good candidate.
A monarch butterfly finds the palmleaf mistflower to be a tasty treat. CAES News
Butterfly Attractor
When I moved into my new house about this time last year, I was quick to notice my neighbor’s flowers across the street. I could see drifts of wonderful, tall, blue flowers coupled with the complementary orange of swirling Gulf fritillary butterflies. I knew immediately that my neighbor was a real gardener, as those showy blooms could be identified as the native blue mistflower known botanically as Conoclinium coelestinum.
Crotons are the perfect choice for fall decoration, especially when partnered with Belgian mums. CAES News
Tropical Autumn Shrub
For the amount of impact they give, crotons are certainly a good investment for home landscapes. Depending on the size you buy, they will reach 2 feet tall and perhaps a little wider. The heat and humidity prevalent in much of Georgia create the perfect conditions to allow crotons to thrive. Wherever I look, whether grown with elephant ears, hibiscus or the Hawaiian ti plant, crotons look festive and tropical.
Ornamentals, like native azalea 'Rosy Cheeks,' perform well when planted in the fall. The key is to follow proper planting techniques. This includes digging the planting hole twice as big as the plant's rootball and breaking up the rootball before planting. CAES News
Fall Ornamentals
Fall has arrived! As the summer heat begins to subside, fall becomes an ideal time to plant woody ornamentals. Following proper planting procedures is essential or problems will arise later.