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Yard bird art adorns a theme garden at the Georgia Research and Education Garden on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Curb Appeal
Whether driving in our own neighborhood or going to visit friends or relatives, we all tend to compare our home landscape to others. There’s no denying that a well-landscaped house is very appealing to the eye and can make a home more inviting.
CAES horticulture professor Tim Smalley leads his students on a walking plant ID tour on the UGA campus in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Tim Smalley Honored
Tim Smalley, associate professor of horticulture in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named a Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professors, the university’s highest recognition for excellence in instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.
Oak leaf blister (Taphrina caerulescens). www.ipmimages.org CAES News
Oak Leaf Blister
Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. The leaf spot disease seen most often on oak trees this year is caused by a fungus known as Taphrina caerulescens, or oak leaf blister.
Phenoxy herbicide damage to a willow oak tree. CAES News
Herbicide Labels
An herbicide designed to kill weeds in turfgrass can also kill neighboring trees and shrubs.
Fall is not the best time to prune most trees and shrubs. It is best to wait until late winter, around February or early March. CAES News
Winter Projects
Bleak winter landscapes and cold, uninviting temperatures can try a gardener’s patience. It doesn’t have to be that way.
This diagram shows the locations and numbered sequence of cuts to remove a branch from a tree. CAES News
Pruning Class
Learn how to properly prune ornamentals at upcoming University of Georgia classes offered on the campus in Griffin. The one-day course will be offered Feb. 27 and March 6 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. in the Student Learning Center on the UGA Griffin Campus.
When transplanting a tree, dig the new hole 50 percent wider than the soil ball to loosen the surrounding soil and ensure good root establishment. The root system should be at the same depth it was before it was moved. CAES News
Protect Bare Roots
Landscape planting season is upon us and home gardeners may be eager to buy new fruit trees and ornamentals. New plant material is often produced bare root — without soil — and must be either kept in cold storage or temporarily planted outdoors to survive.