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164 results found for Lawn Maintenance
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist Bob Westerfield displays several pieces of lawn and garden equipment during a class on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Equipment Workshop
An upcoming Small Engine Maintenance and Repair Workshop will teach attendees how to properly select, troubleshoot and maintain common garden and landscape equipment; sharpen hand tools, knives and chainsaws; tune motors; and properly prepare engines for long-term storage. Offered by the University of Georgia, the class will be held on the Griffin, Georgia, campus.
Tomato transplants grown from seeds are ready to begin an adjustment to outdoor temperatures. CAES News
Winter Chores
February is here and, even though it is cold outside, many garden tasks can be completed now in preparation for a successful growing season. From starting seeds indoors to cleaning and sharpening garden tools, there are plenty of garden chores to do before spring arrives.
CAES News
Landscape Resolutions
The new year is a time for making new personal resolutions. Consider also making some resolutions to prevent problems in the garden throughout 2018. These gardening resolutions could even be easier to keep than personal resolutions like eating less and exercising more.
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, conducts research on turfgrass and ornamental plant pests. Joseph also works with UGA Cooperative Extension agents and teaches an entomology laboratory course for UGA students enrolled in the plant protection and pest management master's degree program. CAES News
New Entomologist
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, will research turfgrass and ornamental plant pests as the newest member of the UGA Turfgrass Team.
A roll of freshly harvested sod CAES News
Sod 101
Georgia turfgrass producers and industry leaders will gather Tuesday, Oct. 31, and Wednesday, Nov. 1, in Ft. Valley, Georgia, for the annual Georgia Sod and Turf Producers Field Day. Industry leaders and university experts will provide updates on turfgrass-related topics, and the latest equipment will be displayed and demonstrated at the event’s trade show.
Tall fescue research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Tall Fescue Time
To successfully establish a new tall fescue lawn or interseed an existing lawn, consider the following techniques and practices from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Yellow leaves on a tree in the fall of the year CAES News
Mower Mulching
Everyone loves to have good shade trees in their yard, but once summer is over, most people despise dealing with fallen leaves. There is an option that avoids having to rake leaves altogether: Let your mower do the work.
Beware of burrweed in your lawn. CAES News
Drought & Lawns
Last year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.  
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
Room to Grow
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.