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85 results found for Pecans
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18 CAES News
Ag Disaster Meeting
All farmers with crops and commodities affected by Hurricane Michael are invited to attend an agriculture disaster assistance information session to be held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center at 2 p.m. Monday, October 22.
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Georgia's Pecan Crop
Georgia’s pecan industry was forever changed by Hurricane Michael’s path of destruction through the southwest part of the state on Oct. 10-11, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
Angelita Acebes is the new Extension pecan entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
New Pecan Entomologist
New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects.
Darrell Sparks was awarded the UGA Inventor of the Year Award in 2018. CAES News
UGA Inventor
Darrell Sparks’ legacy at the University of Georgia spans more than 50 years and includes the release of eight patented pecan cultivars and research focused on the development of new and improved pecan varieties. For his contributions to Georgia’s pecan industry, Sparks is the 2018 recipient of the university’s Inventor of the Year Award.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
Pecan Trees
Dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides, sprayed directly on trees at full rates, kill the plant material they touch, but they don’t travel through the tree or linger from year to year, according to a newly released University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan study. The study also found that drift from the herbicides does not hurt the trees.
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Pecan Tree Management
Pecan season may be over, but Georgia’s producers should continue to scout for pests, like the Asian ambrosia beetle, that could impact future crops.
Lenny Wells conducts a pecan pruning clinic in Wilcox County on Jan. 31, 2018. CAES News
Pecan Pruning
Pruning young pecan trees is a necessity and, if done properly, can save farmers the hassle of pruning older, much larger trees, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecans on the ground on the UGA Tifton Campus in this 2013 photo. CAES News
Georgia Pecan Crop
Hurricane Irma, downgraded to a tropical storm when it entered the state, damaged about 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop, and the storm’s effects could linger into next growing season, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.