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Browse Ants, Termites, Lice and Other Pests Stories - Page 2

113 results found for Ants, Termites, Lice and Other Pests
A large snail species that is native to South America, island apple snails mature in 60 to 80 days and can live in water and on land for more than three years. A single adult snail can produce up to 2,000 eggs every two weeks. CAES News
Island Apple Snails
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agent Jessica Warren is doing her part to knock down populations of invasive snails in Camden County.
A bee collects pollen from a tomatillo flower in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Ground Bees
Ground-nesting bees and wasps may alarm people, but they are actually "good bugs" that pollinate plants and feed on harmful insect pests. 
A group of black flies CAES News
Black Flies
One of the best things about living above the fall line in Georgia has always been the lack of gnat swarms, but that seems to have changed this spring.
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies. CAES News
Ant Queens
In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that’s not always the way ant societies function.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug
A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Pesticide Safety
Hundreds of people get sick each year from inappropriate pesticide use, but those who don’t deal with pesticides daily may not think about it very often. Of the 11 states participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) pesticide safety program, workers reported 853 serious injuries from pesticides in 2011, according to the CDC.
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Controlling Fire Ants
Fall is perfect for playing football, picking pumpkins and killing fire ants. Tackling the stinging pests now will cut down on the number you encounter next spring and summer, according to entomologists with the University of Georgia.