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During January 2018, temperatures across Georgia were below normal. CAES News
During January 2018, temperatures across Georgia were below normal.
Cool, dry January
Georgia saw a cooler-than-normal start to the year, and most of the state posted average temperatures between 2.5 and 4 degrees below normal. With cool, dry air expected to dominate Georgia’s climate in coming weeks, there is a chance that drought could continue expanding across the state and may persist through the spring.
Mickey Taylor, front row, third from left, coordinates the Georgia's Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) through University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. He recently attended a conference in Qui Nhon, Vietnam, where he discussed best practices for implementing pesticide regulation and education programs in emerging economies. CAES News
Mickey Taylor, front row, third from left, coordinates the Georgia's Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) through University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. He recently attended a conference in Qui Nhon, Vietnam, where he discussed best practices for implementing pesticide regulation and education programs in emerging economies.
Pesticide Safety Outreach
In the U.S., the most toxic pesticides can only be purchased and used by those who’ve undergone rigorous training. In some other countries, that’s not the case. Mickey Taylor, who coordinates Georgia’s Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) through University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, recently attended a conference in Qui Nhon, Vietnam. There, Taylor discussed best practices for implementing pesticide regulation and education programs in emerging economies.
In order for hunters, like University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Keith Fielder, to land deer like this nine-point buck, Georgia's deer population needs proper nutrition. A variety of foods are essential to a healthy herd. Much like humans, deer need proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water. CAES News
In order for hunters, like University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Keith Fielder, to land deer like this nine-point buck, Georgia's deer population needs proper nutrition. A variety of foods are essential to a healthy herd. Much like humans, deer need proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water.
Whitetail Nutrition
While deer can survive for a relatively long period of time on little to no food, the effects of a nutritional deficiency can be seen for up to two years after the deficiency. This often results in decreased body weights, decreased birth weights and decreased antler mass across the population.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017.
Georgia's Peanut Crop
Georgia’s dryland peanut crop excelled this year, while irrigated fields lacked in comparison to past years, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort. The result is a crop estimated to average 4,400 pounds per acre.
UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells communicates regularly to industry leaders and Georgia pecan farmers through his blog at blog.extension.uga.edu/pecan/. He provides updates on timely topics like pecan prices, what pests to watch for and his observations on the crop's harvest. CAES News
UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells communicates regularly to industry leaders and Georgia pecan farmers through his blog at blog.extension.uga.edu/pecan/. He provides updates on timely topics like pecan prices, what pests to watch for and his observations on the crop's harvest.
Extension Blogs
For University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists and agents, blogs are a vital tool for quickly getting information out to Georgia producers.
Through the "Trees for Bees" project, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are teaching children and adults how to create pollinator habitats. To promote a diverse pollinator habitat, plant pollinator-friendly plants, provide nesting boxes for cavity-nesting bees, leave spots of bare ground for ground-nesting bees and allow winter weeds to bloom to increase floral resources. CAES News
Through the "Trees for Bees" project, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are teaching children and adults how to create pollinator habitats. To promote a diverse pollinator habitat, plant pollinator-friendly plants, provide nesting boxes for cavity-nesting bees, leave spots of bare ground for ground-nesting bees and allow winter weeds to bloom to increase floral resources.
Pollinator Habitats
Pollinators are essential to the production of native plants and food crops. To help pollinators like bees and butterflies do their jobs of moving pollen, home gardeners can provide a habitat that provides water and shelter.
A deer in its second year, a yearling, is caught by the lens of a wildlife camera. His small rack of antlers has grown over the past year. Antlers have the fastest growing tissue known to man. With the right nutrition, a buck can grow an excess of 200 inches of bone on his head in a matter of 120 days. CAES News
A deer in its second year, a yearling, is caught by the lens of a wildlife camera. His small rack of antlers has grown over the past year. Antlers have the fastest growing tissue known to man. With the right nutrition, a buck can grow an excess of 200 inches of bone on his head in a matter of 120 days.
Deer Rut
Once again, it is that time of year when bucks start chasing does, and deer hunters hit the woods. You guessed it: It is time for the rut, or breeding, season. But the question to be answered is, “How do biologists predict when the rut is going to be?”
Though the leaves haven't fallen, this Finch Gold possumhaw holly is already showing out with branches filled with golden berries. CAES News
Though the leaves haven't fallen, this Finch Gold possumhaw holly is already showing out with branches filled with golden berries.
Golden Berry
This time of the year, everyone is thinking of decking the halls with hollies and their colorful red berries, but you just may want to consider adding a touch of gold. Can you even imagine hollies with bright golden berries? These would show out in the landscape like small trees or shrubs adorned with a thousand little golden lights — and the same for the mantel! My preference, however, would be to see birds celebrating with a Christmas feast.
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo. CAES News
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo.
Peach Crop
Cooler temperatures are needed this winter to avoid another disastrous peach season, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension County coordinator in Taylor and Peach counties. 
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014.
Pecan Harvest
Tropical Storm Irma broke pecan tree limbs, knocked trees down and blew nuts off the trees and out of their shucks when it moved through Georgia in early September, yet University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is still optimistic about this year’s crop. He estimates yields ranging from 85 to 100 million pounds.