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Picture of wheat research trial being conducted by Reagan Noland and Dennis Hancock. CAES News
Picture of wheat research trial being conducted by Reagan Noland and Dennis Hancock.
Wheat Crop
Wheat prices are down, and wheat acreage in Georgia is dropping. To boost the state’s wheat industry and help producers get more out of their crop, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension small-grains specialist Reagan Noland is researching a dual-use system that would enable growers to use their wheat crop for grain and forage production.
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state. CAES News
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
Research Assistant Dean
Beginning March 1, Robert N. Stougaard will be the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He will be responsible for the overall supervision of the college’s seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia.
Conservation Innovation Grant
A $198,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-sponsored Conservation Innovation Grant will support ongoing University of Georgia research on cover crops and the effects of those crops on water quality and availability for row crop production.
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau. CAES News
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau.
2017 Ag Forecast
In 2017, Georgia row crop farmers will likely devote more acreage to the state’s tried-and-true commodities: cotton and peanuts. This and other agricultural projections for the year were the focus of the 10th annual Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series, held across the state Jan. 18-27.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015.
2016 Ag Forecast
Georgia’s economy will be on the rise in 2016, fueled by population growth, resurgence of the housing market and major projects across the state, including two new professional sports stadiums planned for metro Atlanta. Georgians can also expect to continue to pay less for a gallon of milk, and for meat producers, exports look encouraging for beef and pork.
Jerry Johnson, a University of Georgia professor of crop and soil sciences, has developed or co-developed a total of 44 new small grain crop varieties, including several wheat and barley cultivars. He was recently named UGA's 2015 Inventor of the Year. CAES News
Jerry Johnson, a University of Georgia professor of crop and soil sciences, has developed or co-developed a total of 44 new small grain crop varieties, including several wheat and barley cultivars. He was recently named UGA's 2015 Inventor of the Year.
Inventor of the Year
As a young man working on his family’s farm in Perry, Georgia, Jerry Johnson loved the sight of wheat growing in the fields. Decades later, Johnson, now a respected plant breeder and crop and soil sciences professor, received the 2015 Inventor’s Award from the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) for his work breeding wheat varieties for farmers in Georgia and across the Southeast.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico. CAES News
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico.
D.W. Brooks Lecture
In a time of public debate over the effectiveness and safety of genetically modified foods, it’s hard to picture the era before crop breeders developed grain varieties that could withstand drought and common diseases.
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times. CAES News
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times.
Nitrogen Deficiency
In light of recent wet weather, nitrogen deficiency problems have shown up in some small grains and ryegrass fields.
Cotton is one of the many crops that the UGA Statewide Variety Testing Program does research on every year. CAES News
Cotton is one of the many crops that the UGA Statewide Variety Testing Program does research on every year.
Statewide Variety Testing
Georgia farmers need to know what crops can be grown efficiently and successfully in their region of the state. Guidance from University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences personnel with the college’s Statewide Variety Testing program help farmers decide what to plant in the spring.