Menu

More than 45 Georgia counties participate in Georgia 4-H Virtual Project Achievement

By for CAES News

More than 425 fourth, fifth and sixth graders participated in Georgia 4-H’s recent Virtual Cloverleaf Project Achievement contest. In response to the cancellation of five area Project Achievement contests due to the COVID-19 crisis, Georgia 4-H faculty and staff quickly developed the Virtual Project Achievement Contest.

Last year, more than 3,700 youth collectively participated in more than a dozen Cloverleaf Project Achievement contests around the state. Thirteen area contests were originally scheduled for this year. While eight contests were held before March, more than 1,500 youth were registered to participate in the remaining contests. Ultimately, youth from 47 counties in all regions of Georgia were able to compete through the Virtual Project Achievement Contest.

“I am truly thankful to be a part of an organization that continuously works to provide opportunities for youth in Georgia,” said Keisha Jones, Dodge County 4-H agent. “Virtual Project Achievement did not disappoint. Our parents and students were more than eager to showcase their hard work and they thank Georgia 4-H for the creativity and hard work it took to make this happen for them.”

The Project Achievement competition helps youth develop leadership, creativity, public speaking skills and a deep understanding of their desired project area.

Youth select from 62 project focus categories and prepare presentations on the county and area levels. When competing on the area level, participants prepare and are judged on a four- to six-minute presentation about their selected subject. For the online contest, youth uploaded a video of their presentation and their work was evaluated virtually by 170 UGA Extension staff and volunteer judges.

The area level is the final tier for the younger participants in 4-H. However, as youth progress through the 4-H program, students have the opportunity to compete on district and state levels.

Participating youth were celebrated through a statewide video posted to social media outlets and viewable at t.uga.edu/5S5. Georgia 4-H has also provided resources to staff to assist in celebrating these youth virtually on a local and district level.

“These young people, with the support of their adult leaders and mentors, have contributed hours preparing for their presentations,” said Keri Hobbs, Extension 4-H specialist. “It is important that we take time to celebrate the accomplishments of these young people, even during times of social-distancing, as they demonstrate mastery of their topics. While awards ceremonies will be a little different than before, it seems fitting this spring that we’ll recognize these youth virtually – through social media and online meeting tools.” 

Georgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 242,000 people annually through University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org.

Cristina deRevere is the public relations coordinator for Georgia 4-H.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.
Download Image