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Today's washing machines are a far cry from the one Grandma used. With all the bells, whistles and options, buying a new washing machine, or dryer, can feel like new car shopping. CAES News
Washing Machines
Thanks to technology and manufacturers’ attempts to please the ever-demanding consumer, washing machines have become more “intelligent” and able to detect soil levels and water needs. Before buying a new one, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension home experts suggest asking yourself a few very important questions.
CAES News
Energy Saving Tips
No matter what kind of heating and cooling system you have, you can save money and increase your comfort. With extreme temperatures come high energy bills, but you'd be surprised how easy it is to decrease energy consumption. Start by following these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
CAES News
Safe Drinking Water
Spring water from springs scattered across north Georgia may taste better than tap water, but that doesn’t mean it is safe to drink. The truth is that these spring water sources are not tested or treated.
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
Radon Testing
The University of Georgia Radon Education Program recommends testing your home for radon in recognition of National Radon Action Month in January.
PRIDE, Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error, is one of five programs selected for inclusion in a new national publication highlighting innovative programs that are effective in reducing teen driver crashes. The program, developed by the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, helps both parents and teenagers develop safe driving habits. CAES News
Traffic Safety Grant
The University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded a $642,900 grant from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety to continue its statewide education programs in the areas of child passenger safety, parent and teen driving safety and senior driver education.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Well Testing
Much of Georgia was wetter than normal during November 2015, and with all that rain there’s a chance some runoff may have contaminated private wells around the state. While an odd taste, corrosion and staining are signs of water contamination, most contaminants aren’t readily detectible. Ensuring the safety and quality of your well water requires laboratory testing.
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall. CAES News
Kissing Bugs
Over the last few weeks, many Georgians have focused their attention on the media-hyped coverage of the kissing bug. Much of the sensationalism and worry surrounding this insect boogieman is unwarranted, according to University of Georgia entomologists.
CAES News
Toy Safety
A parent’s top priority is the safety and health of their child, but many parents may unknowingly make mistakes when purchasing toys for their children. As the holidays roll around and wish lists are compiled, a UGA Extension specialist urges parents to be aware of potential dangers.
Pictured, from left, are Quentin Robinson, Georgia Director for USDA Rural Development; Joe West, assistant dean of UGA Tifton Campus; Craig Kvien; Lisa Mensah, USDA Rural Development Undersecretary; and Representative Austin Scott. CAES News
USDA Grant
In an effort to use the latest technological advancements to benefit families, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences a $72,000 grant.