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Late summer is the right time to prepare soil for September to October plantings of cool-season crops such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, kale, Swiss chard and Brussels sprouts. CAES News
Winter Garden Prep
The end of summer into early fall tends to be the hottest time of the year in the state of Georgia. Many of us are about tired of laboring in our summer gardens, and the heat, humidity, and disease and insect pressure have certainly taken their toll on our summer crops. However, for those of us who still have the gardening itch, the last weeks of summer are the ideal time to prepare your garden for winter vegetables.
Spalding County was recognized earlier this summer with a 2021 County Excellence Award from Georgia Trend magazine and the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) for the Healthy Life Community Garden (HLCG) project in Griffin, Georgia's Fairmont community. CAES News
Community Garden
Labeled a food desert by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Fairmont community in Griffin, Georgia, has historically had slim options for sourcing fresh, nutritious food nearby. But this desert is becoming an oasis of fresh fruits and vegetables thanks to a group of dedicated agencies and volunteers who have worked hard for nearly 10 years to create a thriving community garden.
Jennifer Thompson (left), associate research scientist in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Tim Griffeth (green shirt), an agriculture teacher at North Oconee High School, are among those working in UGArden. CAES News
Grow It Know It
As a kindergarten teacher, Robin Edens was an outlier in the group of mostly middle and high school teachers at the University of Georgia learning how to introduce food-based learning to their students.
Coreopsis is a genus of flowering plants that has both annual and perennial members, 18 of which are found in Georgia. They range in habitat from sunny and dry to sunny and swampy, and can be found throughout the state. CAES News
Native Plants
August 3 is National Georgia Day, and University of Georgia horticulture professor Bodie Pennisi wants the state’s gardeners to learn more about the native plants that make up Georgia’s landscapes.
Coach Paul Pugliese (left) poses for a photo with the Bartow County 4-H forestry team, including Sasha Morgan, Bethany Craven, Gabriel Craven and Gus Federico. CAES News
Forestry Invitational
Georgia placed first among nine states that competed in the National 4-H Forestry Invitational from July 26 through July 28. Teams from Tennessee and Louisiana placed second and third, respectively. Florida, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia also competed in this year’s Invitational.
After molting into adults, periodical cicadas will move or fly to nearby vertical structures, especially shrubs and trees. The females will eventually lay their eggs on the ends of tree branches. CAES News
Tree Flagging
The emergence of Brood X exceeded expectations in north Georgia, as those of us who happen to reside in the “cicada zone” observed droves of periodical cicadas during the peak of the event. Over the past weeks, the song of the male periodical cicada has faded and fewer of these fascinating insects remain, but a sign of their passing is still evident.
Georgia First Lady and UGA graduate Marty Kemp's support for Georgia 4-H and Georgia FFA led to the establishment of a First Flock of laying hens at the Governor's Mansion in Atlanta. CAES News
First Flock
Thanks to a prize-winning chicken coop design by 4-H and FFA students from Warren County, Georgia’s newly established First Flock now has a stately home on the 18-acre grounds of Governor’s Mansion in Atlanta.
Common seasonal pests like (clockwise from top right) fire ants, houseflies, brown marmorated stink bugs and mosquitos (shown in standing water as larvae) can be controlled with simple tips from UGA Cooperative Extension. CAES News
Summer Pests
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, I see a lot of insects. People leave jars of them on my desk, send me photos or call me out to their gardens to identify them and give control recommendations.
Citizen scientists around the state can help keep track of pollinator health in Georgia by participating in the second Great Georgia Pollinator Census Aug. 21 and 22. CAES News
2021 Great Georgia Pollinator Census
Later this summer, Georgia residents will have the opportunity to help researchers find out what’s the buzz with insect pollinators in their state.