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135 results found for Pesticide
Georgia Pest Management handbooks 2012 CAES News
Pest management guide
The 2012 Georgia Pest Management Handbook is now available. The thirty-third Commercial Edition, published by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, provides more than 800 pages of current information on selection, application and safe use of pest control chemicals around farms, homes, urban areas, recreational areas and other environments where pests may occur.
CAES News
Don't mix chemicals
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agent Frank Watson discusses the proper way to dispose of excess chemicals.
CAES News
Safe disposal
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agent Frank Watson discusses the proper way to dispose of excess chemicals.
Engraver beetles leave pin-sized holds in the bark of pine trees when they exit the tree. CAES News
Pine bark beetles
Pine bark beetles can be the death of pines in forests and home landscapes.
Fall armyworm on a blade of grass CAES News
Fall army worms out
Over the past couple of weeks, I have received numerous calls from curious homeowners and frustrated farmers regarding the dreaded fall armyworm. Damage to established turf is most often aesthetic. However, newly planted sod or sprigs can be severely damaged or even killed by fall armyworm feeding.
Kudzu bugs hide behind a layer of tree bark in South Georgia. CAES News
Kudzu bug multiplies and spreads
Almost two years ago, a tiny immigrant pest arrived in Georgia, and there’s nothing the state’s immigration office can do to make it leave. The bean plataspid, or kudzu bug, munches on kudzu and soybeans and has now set up residence in four Southern states.
Fall webworms CAES News
Nasty web makers
Are you noticing webs in some of the trees throughout your landscape? I always get multiple calls during the late summer and early fall about webs in trees and worms crawling on everything. The fall webworm is the pest weaving these problems.
Southern Mole Cricket CAES News
Tiny turfgrass tunnelers
Adult mole crickets spend winter underground. When temperatures warm, they emerge, feed and mate. Their flights begin in March and continue through June when their numbers, and damage, in an area can increase quickly.
Freshly ground woodchips CAES News
Successful landscaping
Think like a plant. Would you like your feet strapped to a cage, your arms amputated, be buried alive in compost, smothered in mulch or drowned? To avoid some tree, shrub, flower and lawn problems, remember this Top 10 list: