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Browse Houseplants Stories - Page 5

41 results found for Houseplants
CAES News
Drowning plants
With all of the rain Georgia has gotten this winter, it’s easy to forget the state was ever in extreme drought. But just because the drought is over doesn’t mean water conservation practices should stop. Too much water can be just as bad as not enough for plants.
CAES News
Gardening great
South Metro gardeners can learn about spring garden preparation from gardening expert Walter Reeves when he visits the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office in Henry County on Thursday, Feb. 25 at 7 p.m.
Horticulture graduate student Jongyun Kim checks on a plant's soil moisture sensor in UGA horticulture professor Marc van Iersel's greenhouse. CAES News
Save water, save money
Many ornamental nursery growers test to see if their plants need water by sticking a finger in the soil to see if it’s dry. Or, they just water them whether they need it or not. University of Georgia horticulturists have found a better way, one that requires less water, less fertilizer, less money and fewer dirty fingers.
Calceolaria, or pocketbook plant, gets its name from the shape of its flowers. While it grows wild in Chile, the best place to find it in the U.S. is in a florist's shop. CAES News
Give plants
UGA horticulturist Paul Thomas likes to give flowering plants as gifts. A deep basket filled with a few pots of colored calla lilies or a basket with a cluster of cyclamen topped with white or silver grass “makes a stunning gift,” he said.
This is a ornamental pepper plant, pulled off of Bugwood 11/12/09. CAES News
From nasty to poisonous
University of Georgia horticulturalist Paul Thomas can’t think of any common gift plants that are necessarily poisonous -- most of the poisonous plants are those cut for Christmas decorations. He can, however, think of one that will light a child’s or pet’s mouth on fire.