Menu

Browse Flowers Stories - Page 9

165 results found for Flowers
Jim Robbins, University of Arkansas, will present on using unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs or drones, in "Drones in Production – Inventory Management and Stress Detection" at UGA Extension's Academy of Plant Production, June 12-15 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Green Industry Association are inviting veteran nursery and greenhouse growers to “get nerdy” with them this summer at the inaugural Academy of Crop Production, June 12-15 at Hotel Indigo in Athens, Georgia.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Prune After Bloom
Spring-flowering plants are beginning to pop with color. As soon as their color fades, landscapers can prepare to prune and groom these plants.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Celosia is one of many flowering plants that attracts beneficial pollinating insects. Other flowering plants that attract beneficial insects include aster, butterfly weed, coneflower, cosmos, rudbeckia, sunflower and zinnias. CAES News
Bees, Bugs & Blooms
A workshop focused on attracting and protecting beneficial insects will be offered Wednesday, April 20, from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. in Fayetteville, Georgia, by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife expert Michael Mengak tells visitors to a field day how a squirrel trap should be used. CAES News
Critter control
Chewing pests have many Georgia homeowners wondering “Who dunnit?” when their favorite tree or shrub is scarred by teeth marks.
Yard bird art adorns a theme garden at the Georgia Research and Education Garden on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Curb Appeal
Whether driving in our own neighborhood or going to visit friends or relatives, we all tend to compare our home landscape to others. There’s no denying that a well-landscaped house is very appealing to the eye and can make a home more inviting.
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.
A variety of poinsettias. CAES News
Poinsettia Care
Despite their limited, two-month run on retailers' shelves each year, poinsettias are the best- selling potted plant in the United States. Growers sold more than 34.6 million plants in 2014 alone. But that popularity doesn’t always translate into longevity. Come February or March, many of these cherished decorations are droopy, yellowed or worse — in the trash. Here are the top tips on poinsettia care from UGA horticulture expert.