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Browse Ants, Termites, Lice and Other Pests Stories - Page 5

114 results found for Ants, Termites, Lice and Other Pests
A native of Ghana, Maxwell Lamptey is visiting the University of Georgia in the hopes of learning new methods of fighting aflatoxin—a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts. Lamprey is working alongside UGA food scientist Jinru Chen on the university's campus in Griffin, Ga. He is studying different methods of solar drying peanuts. CAES News
Killing Aflatoxin
Maxwell Lamptey is visiting America, specifically Griffin, Georgia, in the hopes of learning new methods to fight aflatoxin — a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts — in his home country of Ghana.
Use tweezers to remove ticks. Pinch the tick close to the mouthparts to remove as much as possible. If the tick head is left behind, don't worry. Having a tick attach itself to your skin is like having a thorn. Your body will expel it over time. CAES News
Ticks in Georgia
Every summer, Georgians head to the mountains and forests to escape the heat. Many return home with a few unintended souvenirs—ticks.
The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, can be found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest if it gets to cotton fields and blueberry patches. CAES News
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug
A University of Georgia entomologist is asking Georgians to help track an insect that loves to stowaway in homes and has the potential to hurt the state’s cotton and blueberry crops. The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, was first spotted in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1998 and has since been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest, too.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Pesticide Recertification Classes
Pesticides can be helpful in controlling insects and diseases, but there are chemicals that should be handled with care. To educate pesticide users, University of Georgia Extension has planned pesticide safety and handling classes in Albany, Savannah and Perry this February and March.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquito Control
As Georgia’s mosquito season draws to a close, mosquito control professionals are looking back, evaluating the season and planning for the challenges they will face next spring.
Kudzu bug CAES News
Fewer Kudzu Bugs
A widespread soybean pest the past five years, the kudzu bug population in Georgia is much lower this growing season.
University of Georgia entomologist Paul Guillebeau teaches children male bees don't sting by placing one in his mouth at a past Insect-ival event. This year's Insect-ival is set for Sept. 13 at the State Botanical Gardens in Athens. UGA entomology club members and faculty from the entomology department will offer exhibits at the event. CAES News
Insect-ival!
The State Botanical Garden of Georgia at the University of Georgia will host the 22nd annual Insect-ival! Family Festival on Sept. 13 from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Visitor Center and Conservatory at the garden in Athens.
Fall armyworm on a blade of grass CAES News
Fall Armyworms
Eighty-one-year-old James Cobb finds mowing, raking and baling hay relaxing. Finding his fields infested with tiny armyworms has the opposite effect.
Squash vine borer larvae live inside the plant stem. One method of control is to physically cut open the stem and remove the tiny pest. First, create a slit parallel to the stem veins. Begin the slit at the frass-covered hole at the base of the plant and continue toward the tip of the vine until the borer is found and removed. Once the borer has been removed, cover the slit portion of the stem with soil and water it to encourage rooting. CAES News
Gardeners' enemy
Backyard squash growers may not agree on which variety is best, but they do agree on one thing – squash vine borers are the enemy.