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Mark McCann (from left) joins Justin Pate, Christian Pate, Scotty Raines, Melanie Raines, Celie Raines, Guy Hancock and CAES Dean Nick Place at a celebration announcing Scotty Raines' selection as 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year during the annual meeting of the Georgia Agribusiness Council.  CAES News
2022 Georgia Farmer Of The Year
For Scotty Raines, the best part of farming is watching the fruits of his labor — witnessing those tiny seeds crack through the ground, bursting with life. Awe and dedication have paid off for Raines, who was just recognized with the title of 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year by the Georgia Agribusiness Council.
Examples of a living mulch (top) and cereal rye cover crop terminated prior to planting (bottom). CAES News
Cover Crops, Living Mulches
For most row crop producers in Georgia, corn, cotton and peanut are planted in the spring and harvested in late fall. After harvest, the ground is left relatively bare, with the residue of the harvested crop the only organic material left on the ground. This is where cover crops come in.
Cotton seedlings planted over a rye cover crop. After harvest, cotton fields are planted with a cover crop. Before cotton is planted the next season, the cover crop is killed and rolled , then the cotton seeds are planted using either a no-till or strip-till system. The resulting "mulch" provided by the cover crop residue provides insect habitat, moisture retention and some weed suppression. CAES News
Crop Ecology
The use of cover crops has risen among both traditional and organic producers for a variety of reasons — to control erosion, choke out weeds, improve soil health and enhance water availability. Now research by University of Georgia scientists is examining which cover crops also may provide important habitat for predatory insects that could help control disease- and damage-causing pests in cotton.
The UGA cotton research team identified 24 Georgia counties where the presence of cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV) has been confirmed from commercial fields and UGA research farms during 2018-2019. CAES News
Cotton Leaf Roll Dwarf Virus
While aphids aren’t a direct threat to cotton plants, they can carry a persistent virus that is difficult to control and can cause significant losses in one of Georgia’s most important crops.
At UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 2021 Borlaug Undergraduate Scholar Samantha Wegener discovered precision plant breeding — the combination of gene editing and engineering — which showed her a path to solving complicated issues to improve plant varieties. CAES News
2021 Borlaug Undergraduate Scholar
Samantha Wegener enrolled at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus after earning her associate’s degree in biology from the Technical College of the Lowcountry in Beaufort, South Carolina. It was during her last semester in Beaufort that Wegener was introduced to the world of plant breeding.
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Three products approved
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved new five-year registrations for two dicamba products and extended the registration of an additional dicamba product for use on dicamba-tolerant cotton and soybeans in a decision estimated to save growers and producers of the products millions of dollars in lost revenue.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney speaks about peanuts during the Midville Field Day in 2019. Faculty will give presentations online for this year's field day. CAES News
Midville Field Day 2020
University of Georgia faculty will share the latest research on cotton, soybeans, corn and other southeast Georgia crops during the annual Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center Field Day held online Aug. 12.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Cotton Demand Down
The rapid spread of COVID-19 has severely impacted the global cotton supply chain. An unexpected reduction in cotton mill use data is observed across all of the major cotton spinning countries, including China, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Turkey and Vietnam.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Cotton Market
An investors’ recent pessimism in reaction to coronavirus has induced a business slowdown, the pandemic has cast a shadow on the cotton market as well. May cotton futures for old crops closed at 54.93 cents per pound, and new crop December futures closed at 56.10 cents per pound on March 19.