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Qian Feng, a second-year doctoral candidate in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has mapped additional genes responsible for volatile production in order to offer a more complete picture of the biochemical pathways in tomatoes. She hopes that other researchers can introduce the desirable genes into current or new varieties to breed a tastier  tomato. CAES News
Qian Feng, a second-year doctoral candidate in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has mapped additional genes responsible for volatile production in order to offer a more complete picture of the biochemical pathways in tomatoes. She hopes that other researchers can introduce the desirable genes into current or new varieties to breed a tastier  tomato.
Tastier Tomatoes
Why have tomatoes lost their flavor? Why do some dishes call for ketchup when cooking with tomatoes? These are a couple of the questions that Qian Feng, a second-year University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences doctoral candidate, seeks to answer through her research.
From left, Josh Fuder, Ray Covington and Stephen Mihm have been UGA’s driving forces behind the creation of the Heritage Apple Orchard. (Photo by Mike Terrazas) CAES News
From left, Josh Fuder, Ray Covington and Stephen Mihm have been UGA’s driving forces behind the creation of the Heritage Apple Orchard. (Photo by Mike Terrazas)
Heirloom Varieties
The names tick off like racehorses or colors from some fancy catalog: Carolina Red June, Duchess of Oldenburg, Hewe’s Crab and Rabun Bald, Limbertwig, Nickajack, Parks’ Pippin and many more. But these aren’t paint chips — they’re apples, hundreds of varieties that thrived in orchards across North Georgia a century ago, before an evolving apple industry swept them off shelves and tables, never to return.
Postharvest blueberries were tested under blue light to determine whether the light affected fruit quality or disease development. CAES News
Postharvest blueberries were tested under blue light to determine whether the light affected fruit quality or disease development.
Blue Light and Blueberries
The COVID-19 crisis has put supply chain issues at the forefront of food production and packaging concerns. Researchers at the University of Georgia investigated a potential solution for extending the shelf life of blueberries by exposing blueberries to blue light during storage.
Watermelon research at the UGA-Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelon research at the UGA-Tifton campus.
Fusarium Rapid Test
Fusarium wilt, caused by a soilborne fungus, is one of the most damaging diseases of watermelons worldwide. Since it was discovered in 1894, it’s been a battle for producers to manage through crop rotation and chemical fungicides.
Pink Lady apples hang from a tree at the University of Georgia - Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Pink Lady apples hang from a tree at the University of Georgia - Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga.
Arbor Day
Nationally, Americans recognize Arbor Day in April. However, Georgia celebrates Arbor Day on the third Friday of February each year because this is a better time to plant trees, giving roots time to grow before the heat and drought of our summer months.
The camellia represents desire, passion and admiration — a wonderful choice for Valentine’s Day. CAES News
The camellia represents desire, passion and admiration — a wonderful choice for Valentine’s Day.
Winter Bloomers
I find it ironic that Valentine’s Day occurs in February, a time of the year when we see very few plants blooming in the landscape. In addition to cards and candy, flowers are one of the most popular gifts during this annual celebration of love. In 2018, the Society of American Florists estimated that 250 million cut roses were produced for Valentine’s Day and an estimated 35% of Americans purchased flowers.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
Testing Rootstocks
Ongoing citrus rootstock trials being conducted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Lowndes County hold promise for increased yields, improved fruit quality and greater disease resistance.
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries. CAES News
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries.
Cultivating Southern firs
During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible losses of susceptible firs — including balsam, Fraser, Canaan and others — to the root fungus Phytophthora.
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest. CAES News
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest.
Year-round Beauty
As vibrant holiday plants begin to adorn the shelves of hardware stores, grocery stores and garden centers, consumers are attracted to the pinks, reds and whites atop deep green foliage, which add festive pops of color in winter homes. The appearance of plants like poinsettias and Christmas cacti usher in the holiday season and we love to fill our halls and entryways with their holiday cheer. But what about after the holidays?