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University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. CAES News
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky.
IAFP Honors
Two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences food scientists have been presented awards of excellence from the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat and Professor Francisco Diez were recognized at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24 in Louisville, Kentucky.
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens. CAES News
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens.
Wheat Outbreaks
Consumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. CAES News
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months.
Hep A Threat
Kroger stores in Georgia and across the nation have recalled three frozen berry products because of a possible health risk of hepatitis A. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension urges consumers to take this recall seriously, as the virus can cause serious health issues.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer.
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers.
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility. CAES News
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility.
Easter Food Safety
Easter is right around the corner, and while this holiday can mean different things to different people, many celebrate it with egg dyeing, Easter egg hunts and family meals. That means food safety needs to be part of these springtime traditions too.
Peanut Innovation Lab Assistant Director Jamie Rhoads demonstrates a small-scale sheller in Malawi in March 2019 while working with the Malawi Agricultural Diversification Activity. Photo by Dave Hoisington CAES News
Peanut Innovation Lab Assistant Director Jamie Rhoads demonstrates a small-scale sheller in Malawi in March 2019 while working with the Malawi Agricultural Diversification Activity. Photo by Dave Hoisington
Malawi agriculture partnership
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut at the University of Georgia partners with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Malawi to help farmers diversify their crops.
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018. CAES News
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018.
Pathogens’ Defense
When humans get sick, our immune systems kick into high gear. To help guard against disease, people are increasingly turning to antimicrobial agents — from soaps to wipes to hand sanitizers — to help kill germs. However, scientists have found that some strains of Salmonella pathogens have developed strategies to evade damage.
Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, founder of the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), right, maize field with WACCI co-founder Kwame Offei, center, and maize breeder Martin Adjei. CAES News
Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, founder of the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), right, maize field with WACCI co-founder Kwame Offei, center, and maize breeder Martin Adjei.
WACCI
Cassava, taro, cowpea: these are the crops that are going fuel the next phase of the green revolution. Today, African researchers are working to develop improved varieties of traditional African crops to meet local food security challenges.
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America. CAES News
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America.
Gene Search
University of Georgia food scientist Henk den Bakker is a member of an international team of researchers that has developed a way to quickly search massive amounts of DNA microbial data to identify specific genes, such as the genes responsible for drug-resistant bacteria.