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Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die. CAES News
Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die.
Black Shank Disease
While most Georgia crops are suffering from the recent lack of rainfall across the state, tobacco farmers have some reason to celebrate. Three consecutive weeks of dry weather in May have curbed incidences of black shank disease, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension tobacco agronomist J. Michael Moore.
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light.
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.
Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops. CAES News
Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops.
Warming weather
Georgia temperatures are rising, and the weather is only going to get hotter with little rain in the forecast. That’s not good news for Georgia’s cotton producers who are in the middle of planting this year’s crop, says Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise.
Pollinator Census
In three months, an army of citizen scientists across the state will undertake a first-of-its-kind pollinator count across Georgia. To prepare for the Great Georgia Pollinator Census this August, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a few summer reading suggestions for citizen scientists of all ages.
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program. CAES News
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program.
April Climate
Farmers in the southern half of Georgia benefited from drier conditions this April, while producers in the soggy northern half of the state are still working to prepare fields for spring planting.
A group of black flies CAES News
A group of black flies
Black Flies
One of the best things about living above the fall line in Georgia has always been the lack of gnat swarms, but that seems to have changed this spring.
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do. CAES News
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do.
Irrigation App
University of Georgia scientists have created a new app to help Georgia vegetable growers irrigate their crops more efficiently.
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year. CAES News
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year.
No More Frost
Georgians may be wondering if the state’s last frost of the year has already passed. The answer, of course, depends on where you live and the quirks of the weather.
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Forage Management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.