Menu

Browse Grants & Partnerships Stories

20 results found for Grants & Partnerships
Symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. Brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale, are all susceptible to this plant disease. CAES News
Symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. Brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale, are all susceptible to this plant disease.
Alternaria blight and head rot
A new multistate project will bring together researchers from the University of Georgia and partner universities to fight Alternaria leaf blight and head rot in broccoli, a plant disease that thrives in warm temperatures and humidity.
Huang's team will research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application. CAES News
Huang's team will research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application.
Pollutant Research
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently awarded nearly $1.6 million in research funding to University of Georgia’s Jack Huang to research cost-effective treatments to remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from water, wastewater and biosolids to ensure safe water for drinking and agricultural application in rural areas. Huang, an associate professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences on the UGA Griffin campus, is one of only three researchers whose teams received funding from the EPA.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Ambrosia Beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia. CAES News
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia.
Blueberry Disease
A plant pathologist at the University of Georgia Tifton campus is using a grant from the Georgia Farm Bureau to study a bacterial disease that is harming the state’s blueberry crops. 
Based on the UGA Griffin campus, Bodie Pennisi coordinates a statewide program that supports the professional landscape industry. She also assists UGA Extension agents with landscape troubleshooting, landscape planning and local programming, and she conducts applied research on wildflowers and ornamental plants. CAES News
Based on the UGA Griffin campus, Bodie Pennisi coordinates a statewide program that supports the professional landscape industry. She also assists UGA Extension agents with landscape troubleshooting, landscape planning and local programming, and she conducts applied research on wildflowers and ornamental plants.
Pennisi Awarded
University of Georgia Department of Horticulture Professor Bodie Pennisi has been named a UGA Public Service and Outreach (PSO) Faculty Fellow for 2019-2020. The program provides UGA professors with an opportunity to apply their research and course curriculum to the needs of a specific PSO unit at the university.
Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, two faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation. CAES News
Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, two faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation.
CAREER Grants
Two University of Georgia researchers have been awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, both faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded the five-year grants this year.
Assistant Dean Joe West serves as administrative adviser for a multi-state research project called "Genetic Improvement of Adaptation and Reproduction to Enhance Sustainability of Cow-Calf Production in the Southern United States." CAES News
Assistant Dean Joe West serves as administrative adviser for a multi-state research project called "Genetic Improvement of Adaptation and Reproduction to Enhance Sustainability of Cow-Calf Production in the Southern United States."
Multistate Research
In agricultural research, scientists across disciplines often find themselves working to address the same issues as colleagues at other institutions. To help advance and streamline this important work, funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) allows land-grant university scientists to work collectively to answer questions with a broad scope.
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness CAES News
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness
Tomato Taste
Tomatoes have been bred to create a wide array of colors, shapes and sizes, but not much commercial work has been done on breeding tomatoes that taste good.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo.
IPM Grant
The University of Georgia has been awarded a $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop organic methods of controlling the Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD). 
University of Georgi Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Wayne Parrott and Assistant Professor Jason Wallace are working with the carnivorous water plant bladderwort in hopes that its unique genetic structure can shed some light on ways to reduce crosstalk between new genes during advanced plant breeding. CAES News
University of Georgi Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Wayne Parrott and Assistant Professor Jason Wallace are working with the carnivorous water plant bladderwort in hopes that its unique genetic structure can shed some light on ways to reduce crosstalk between new genes during advanced plant breeding.
Bladderwort Research
With the advent of CRISPR technologies and other precise genome editing methods, it has become faster and easier for crop scientists to breed new varieties. But there are still a few technical roadblocks that need to be overcome.