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Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) have been honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research: plant pathology student Shaun Stice took first place in the Ph.D. category; Sam McDonald, a plant breeding, genetics and genomics student placed second in the Ph.D category; and plant pathology student Caroline Burks received first place in the master’s category. CAES News
Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) have been honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research: plant pathology student Shaun Stice took first place in the Ph.D. category; Sam McDonald, a plant breeding, genetics and genomics student placed second in the Ph.D category; and plant pathology student Caroline Burks received first place in the master’s category.
Graduate Student Awards 2021
Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research.
Qian Feng, a second-year doctoral candidate in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has mapped additional genes responsible for volatile production in order to offer a more complete picture of the biochemical pathways in tomatoes. She hopes that other researchers can introduce the desirable genes into current or new varieties to breed a tastier  tomato. CAES News
Qian Feng, a second-year doctoral candidate in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has mapped additional genes responsible for volatile production in order to offer a more complete picture of the biochemical pathways in tomatoes. She hopes that other researchers can introduce the desirable genes into current or new varieties to breed a tastier  tomato.
Tastier Tomatoes
Why have tomatoes lost their flavor? Why do some dishes call for ketchup when cooking with tomatoes? These are a couple of the questions that Qian Feng, a second-year University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences doctoral candidate, seeks to answer through her research.
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants. CAES News
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants.
SEC Faculty Achievement Award
Peggy Ozias-Akins, D.W. Brooks Professor and Distinguished Research Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named the University of Georgia’s recipient of the Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award.  
Graduate student Philip Bentz (left) and graduate student Rick Field (right) use a carbon dioxide sensor on a plant in the horticulture greenhouses. Bentz enrolled to UGA in the Integrated Plant Sciences program in 2019. (photo by Dorothy Kozlowski, taken prior to March 2020) CAES News
Graduate student Philip Bentz (left) and graduate student Rick Field (right) use a carbon dioxide sensor on a plant in the horticulture greenhouses. Bentz enrolled to UGA in the Integrated Plant Sciences program in 2019. (photo by Dorothy Kozlowski, taken prior to March 2020)
Integrated Plant Sciences
For students with a penchant for plants and the desire to pursue a doctoral degree, the University of Georgia offers a collaborative program that spans a variety of cutting-edge and interdisciplinary plant science disciplines.
Katrien Devos and two colleagues from her lab were part of a nationwide team that produced a high-quality reference sequence of the complex switchgrass genome. (Photo by Peter Frey) CAES News
Katrien Devos and two colleagues from her lab were part of a nationwide team that produced a high-quality reference sequence of the complex switchgrass genome. (Photo by Peter Frey)
Unlocking Switchgrass Genome
As reported Jan. 27 in Nature, a nationwide team that includes University of Georgia faculty member Katrien Devos has produced a high-quality reference sequence of the complex switchgrass genome, marking a critical step for a plant species that has long been studied for its potential application in the production of biofuels.
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist CAES News
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist
Parasitic Hijackers
A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem. CAES News
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem.
Tomato Research
Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit and vegetable crops, including tomatoes, and can cause severe economic losses.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney speaks about peanuts during the Midville Field Day in 2019. Faculty will give presentations online for this year's field day. CAES News
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney speaks about peanuts during the Midville Field Day in 2019. Faculty will give presentations online for this year's field day.
Midville Field Day 2020
University of Georgia faculty will share the latest research on cotton, soybeans, corn and other southeast Georgia crops during the annual Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center Field Day held online Aug. 12.
Professor Esther van der Knaap, who works at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture and Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, is part of the team that is unlocking the history of ancient tomatoes to breed a more sustainable future for modern crops. CAES News
Professor Esther van der Knaap, who works at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture and Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, is part of the team that is unlocking the history of ancient tomatoes to breed a more sustainable future for modern crops.
Building Better Tomatoes
New technology has led to a greater understanding of how gene placement within the tomato genome influences gene expression and, therefore, the characteristics of the resulting plant’s fruit, a discovery that is important for breeders and producers.