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Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke. CAES News
Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke.
Coffee Intake
Many people start their day with a cup of coffee, and that’s not necessarily a bad habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers moderate caffeine intake to be 300 milligrams of coffee each day. That’s two to four cups. And studies show that coffee, in moderation, can promote a variety of health benefits.
The University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) has launched a newly revamped website. Known as “Food eTalk,” the program offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes. CAES News
The University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) has launched a newly revamped website. Known as “Food eTalk,” the program offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes.
SNAP Website
University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), which offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes known as “Food eTalk,” has launched a newly revamped website at https://www.foodtalk.org/.
Denise Everson talks to a class about making healthy food choices to limit their risk of developing cancer. CAES News
Denise Everson talks to a class about making healthy food choices to limit their risk of developing cancer.
Healthier Georgians
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension focuses on improving the quality of life and health of Georgia residents. Georgia Extension agents and specialists develop programs that help families to engage in physical activity, decrease obesity, live with cancer and diabetes, prepare meals safely, and eat healthily while stretching their food dollars.
Eating Insects Athens, held by the North American Coalition for Insect Agriculture, will draw hundreds of insect agriculture and insect gastronomy advocates to Athens from Aug. 13 to 15. CAES News
Eating Insects Athens, held by the North American Coalition for Insect Agriculture, will draw hundreds of insect agriculture and insect gastronomy advocates to Athens from Aug. 13 to 15.
Eating Insects Athens
Athens, Georgia’s growing reputation as a gastronomic capital attracts culinary tourists from all over the Southeast. This summer, the city will welcome a new type of culinary enthusiasm. They won’t be after barbecue or biscuits. They’ll be here for the bugs. 
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension nutrition experts say the best way to teach your child to eat healthier is by being a role model. By eating fruits or vegetables you want them to try, you show your children that you aren't asking them to eat something that you don't eat. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension nutrition experts say the best way to teach your child to eat healthier is by being a role model. By eating fruits or vegetables you want them to try, you show your children that you aren't asking them to eat something that you don't eat.
Healthy Meals
Children look to adults for guidance in all aspects of their lives. Their behaviors are directly influenced by the behaviors they observe in adults. This applies to eating, too. 
CAES News
Peanut Research Proposals
The Peanut Innovation Lab has issued requests for proposals in two new areas of inquiry: nutrition and gender/youth.
Kisha Faulk tries her first roasted oyster while her coworker Barbara Worley looks on. The two women were among the participants in a recent Ocean to Table workshop designed to increase consumers' and UGA Extension agents' knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood. CAES News
Kisha Faulk tries her first roasted oyster while her coworker Barbara Worley looks on. The two women were among the participants in a recent Ocean to Table workshop designed to increase consumers' and UGA Extension agents' knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood.
Ocean to Table
The brainchild of Chatham County Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Agent Jackie Ogden, the Ocean to Table workshop series is designed to increase consumers’ and UGA Extension agents’ knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County.
Mobile Markets
There’s nothing tastier than fresh greens or summer tomatoes from the neighborhood farmers market, but if you can’t make it to a market in metro Atlanta this summer, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has you covered.
CAES News
Clean Eating
Over the past few years, “clean eating” has become a popular way to describe a diet of simple foods, and food manufacturers have taken note. Following consumer demand, food companies have simplified their ingredient lists, introduced clean labeling and started to advertise their products as “clean.”
Annika Sorrow eats a strawberry while sitting on a raised bed at Washington Farms, Watkinsville. May 2008 CAES News
Annika Sorrow eats a strawberry while sitting on a raised bed at Washington Farms, Watkinsville. May 2008
Veggie Eaters
Increasing a child’s exposure to a new food increases the likelihood the child will consume it and become healthier in the process, according to MaryBeth Hornbeck, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Rockdale County.  To encourage children between the ages of 2 and 6 to eat produce, Hornbeck says parents should be vigilant and introduce new fruits and vegetables to their children.