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When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes.
Emergency Water
Most Americans take for granted having fresh, clean water to drink, but that valuable resource isn’t guaranteed during times of emergency. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert Gary Hawkins says, no matter whether your drinking water comes from a private well or a municipal source, having an emergency supply of water is something everyone should have.
Iron bacteria residue occurs where an area of water becomes exposed to oxygen. The iron bacteria use the oxygen in this zone to convert ferrous iron into ferric iron. As a result, the iron changes into a rusty, red precipitate. This material can also appear as a fluffy or filamentous, organic material as a result of the bacteria growing. CAES News
Iron bacteria residue occurs where an area of water becomes exposed to oxygen. The iron bacteria use the oxygen in this zone to convert ferrous iron into ferric iron. As a result, the iron changes into a rusty, red precipitate. This material can also appear as a fluffy or filamentous, organic material as a result of the bacteria growing.
Iron Bacteria
The smell of foul odors as well as the sight of brown or red, slimy substances or an oily sheen on the surface of streams and wetlands has some people concerned about water quality. Solid, rust-colored particles are actually a naturally occurring result of iron bacteria. It doesn't pose any human health risks, but the red, slimy sludge can clog pipes and pumps when using well water.
CAES News
Safe Drinking Water
Spring water from springs scattered across north Georgia may taste better than tap water, but that doesn’t mean it is safe to drink. The truth is that these spring water sources are not tested or treated.
The second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
The second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon.
Radon Testing
The University of Georgia Radon Education Program recommends testing your home for radon in recognition of National Radon Action Month in January.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes.
Well Testing
Much of Georgia was wetter than normal during November 2015, and with all that rain there’s a chance some runoff may have contaminated private wells around the state. While an odd taste, corrosion and staining are signs of water contamination, most contaminants aren’t readily detectible. Ensuring the safety and quality of your well water requires laboratory testing.
Representatives of UGA's Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratory will be on hand to answer gardeners' soil questions in downtown Atlanta on Aug. 27 at Love Local: A Soil Festival to Grow Healthier Communities. CAES News
Representatives of UGA's Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratory will be on hand to answer gardeners' soil questions in downtown Atlanta on Aug. 27 at Love Local: A Soil Festival to Grow Healthier Communities.
Soil Testing
Over the past decade, there’s been a push for suburbanites and city dwellers to understand where their food comes from and to get closer to the land. University of Georgia soil scientist Jason Lessl believes that people can’t get closer to the land until they know how it works.
Water runs from a silver faucet. CAES News
Water runs from a silver faucet.
Save Water
Fortunately, Georgia is not currently under drought conditions. However, more and more people are “living green” and being conservative users of natural resources. It’s easy to conserve water by following these tips from University of Georgia Extension.
Calvin Perry, superintendent of the UGA Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia, speaks about center pivot irrigation during 4-H20 camp held on Tuesday. CAES News
Calvin Perry, superintendent of the UGA Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia, speaks about center pivot irrigation during 4-H20 camp held on Tuesday.
4H20 Camp
Southwest Georgia 4-Hers were soaked with information this week as they learned about one of the world’s most prized resources — water.