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University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases. CAES News
University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases.
Winter Squash
By determining the varieties best suited for the area, University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash. He has found that Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins, as well as Choctaw and 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato squashes, hold up best against squash pests and diseases.
University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling. CAES News
University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling.
Battling Blotch
Georgia farmers struggle to control bacterial fruit blotch (BFB), but University of Georgia plant pathologists have discovered that naturally occurring bacteria can combat the disease.
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree CAES News
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree
Tree Decay
Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at tree trunks and buttress roots. Many trees that topple look perfectly healthy before they fall. Afterward, it becomes clear that there were absolutely no structural roots remaining for support.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015.
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.
Bottles of pesticides line the shelves of a home improvement store in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Bottles of pesticides line the shelves of a home improvement store in Griffin, Georgia.
Pesticide Recertification Classes
Pesticides can be helpful in controlling insects and diseases, but there are chemicals that should be handled with care. To educate pesticide users, University of Georgia Extension has planned pesticide safety and handling classes in Albany, Savannah and Perry this February and March.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth.
Better, Healthier Cotton
Breeding cotton varieties with resistance to root-knot nematodes and better cotton fiber quality are at the forefront of Peng Chee’s research at the University of Georgia.
In this file photo, an array of pesticides are lined on the shelves of a Griffin, Ga., feed and seed store. CAES News
In this file photo, an array of pesticides are lined on the shelves of a Griffin, Ga., feed and seed store.
Pesticide Applicator Classes
Certified pesticide applicators need recertification training and credits to keep their licenses up-to-date. To help provide this training, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has planned pesticide applicator recertification classes in Savannah, Griffin and Cartersville this February.
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease. CAES News
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease.
White Mold Disease
Most Georgia peanut farmers do not spray fungicides on their crop at night. But University of Georgia plant pathologists say nighttime is the best time to spray for white mold disease.
Spring is right around the corner, and so are spring flowers, summer vegetables and all the gardening these seasons bring. CAES News
Spring is right around the corner, and so are spring flowers, summer vegetables and all the gardening these seasons bring.
Powdery mildew
If the dogwood trees in your landscape are shedding their leaves, they may be suffering the side affects of powdery mildew.
Katherine Stevenson, a plant pathologist, has been part of the University of Georgia since 1992. CAES News
Katherine Stevenson, a plant pathologist, has been part of the University of Georgia since 1992.
Fungicide resistance
Gummy stem blight can be a tough foe for watermelon farmers to tackle. With the ability to cause lesions on leaves and turn stems into gooey mush, the plant disease can cripple watermelon production.