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Irrigation maintenance is key for farmers to avoid costly malfunctions once the growing season begins. CAES News
Irrigation maintenance is key for farmers to avoid costly malfunctions once the growing season begins.
Corn Irrigation
During a summer when Georgia corn farmers have relied heavily on their irrigation systems working effectively, many struggled with equipment malfunctions that may have reduced crop yields. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist Wes Porter believes that those problems can be avoided in the future if producers make necessary modifications after the growing season.
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties. CAES News
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties.
CSSA Fellow
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA).
Reddening leaf tips indicate damage to oats and appears to be caused by barley yellow dwarf virus. CAES News
Reddening leaf tips indicate damage to oats and appears to be caused by barley yellow dwarf virus.
Oats
From what’s being observed in some South Georgia pastures this fall, oats are struggling, with growers seeing issues from cold damage, nutrient and moisture stress and possible Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus. Above average rainfall in November and December also have prevented cattle from getting into oat pastures for winter grazing.
Millet close-up CAES News
Millet close-up
Resilient Pearl Millet
As farmers around the world battle extreme drought and other climate events, researchers turn to pearl millet to find ways to make other grains more resilient to climate change. A global team of 65 scientists, including nine from the University of Georgia, have decoded some of the secrets to the crop’s coping strategies.
Extension agronomist Reagan Noland holds a bachelor's degree in natural resource management from Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, a master's degree in agronomy from Texas A&M University and a doctorate in agronomy and agroecology from the University of Minnesota. CAES News
Extension agronomist Reagan Noland holds a bachelor's degree in natural resource management from Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, a master's degree in agronomy from Texas A&M University and a doctorate in agronomy and agroecology from the University of Minnesota.
Reagan Noland
Reagan Noland, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest agronomist, specializes in corn, soybean and small grains like wheat, oats, barley and rye. These commodities have a combined Georgia farm gate value of almost $450 million.
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau. CAES News
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau.
2017 Ag Forecast
In 2017, Georgia row crop farmers will likely devote more acreage to the state’s tried-and-true commodities: cotton and peanuts. This and other agricultural projections for the year were the focus of the 10th annual Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series, held across the state Jan. 18-27.
UGA Regents Professor Andrew Paterson is leading an international team working toward sustainable intensification of sorghum production. CAES News
UGA Regents Professor Andrew Paterson is leading an international team working toward sustainable intensification of sorghum production.
Drought Tolerant Sorghum
When University of Georgia plant geneticist Andrew Paterson began searching for lines of sorghum that might survive in some of the most parched places in the world, he didn’t plant trials in the desert.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016.
Research Funding
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico. CAES News
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico.
D.W. Brooks Lecture
In a time of public debate over the effectiveness and safety of genetically modified foods, it’s hard to picture the era before crop breeders developed grain varieties that could withstand drought and common diseases.