Menu

Browse Commercial Plant Disease Stories

105 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year.
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
Georgia's Southern Piedmont grape farmers are finding success with hybrid varieties  popularized in Texas wine country, like these Lenoir grapes grown in Haralson County. CAES News
Georgia's Southern Piedmont grape farmers are finding success with hybrid varieties  popularized in Texas wine country, like these Lenoir grapes grown in Haralson County.
Downy Mildew Disease
Fungicide resistance to downy mildew disease is a growing concern for Georgia grape producers. University of Georgia Extension Fruit Disease Specialist Phil Brannen advises growers to modify their fungicide applications to combat the increasing resistance.
Emran Ali works in the Plant Molecular Diagnostic Lab at UGA-Tifton.

August 30, 2018 CAES News
Emran Ali works in the Plant Molecular Diagnostic Lab at UGA-Tifton.

August 30, 2018
Plant Molecular Diagnostic Lab
When farmers are fighting a disease that is attacking their crop, time is of the essence. 
Stanley Culpepper looks for cotton plants among pigweed at a plot at the Ponder Farm in Tifton, Georgia. CAES News
Stanley Culpepper looks for cotton plants among pigweed at a plot at the Ponder Farm in Tifton, Georgia.
Postemergence Herbicides
Using postemergence herbicides to control problematic weeds has been recently successful for Georgia cotton farmers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease. CAES News
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease.
Watermelon Research
Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017.
Peanut Rotations
Farmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts.
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry. CAES News
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry.
Blueberry Disease
The key to managing Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease in blueberries, which makes the fruit unmarketable, is one application of lime sulfur approximately two weeks prior to bud break, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whitefly Management
University of Georgia entomologists advise farmers to kill crops capable of hosting whiteflies after the crop is harvested a final time. Crops left in the field could continue to serve as hosts.
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus.
Watermelon Crop
Georgia farmers had fewer opportunities to effectively harvest watermelons in June thanks to an increase in rain, but disease pressure is what truly led to lower yields in the crop this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong.