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Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry. CAES News
Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry.
Zoysia Shortage
Zoysiagrass is gaining in popularity throughout Georgia. Couple increased popularity with a wet and overcast 2018 growing season and some Georgia sod producers are seeing a decline in their inventory.
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program. CAES News
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program.
April Climate
Farmers in the southern half of Georgia benefited from drier conditions this April, while producers in the soggy northern half of the state are still working to prepare fields for spring planting.
A push mower used to mow turfgrass. CAES News
A push mower used to mow turfgrass.
Green Up
While many warm-season turfgrass species have shown signs of significant green-up, some grasses and locations still have an appearance of being dormant or slowly transitioning.  
While Americans are familiar with one or two varieties of peanut, farmers in other parts of the world have been able to develop hundreds of varieties thanks to the peanut's natural ability to shuffle its two distinct subgenomes to produce new traits. These are some of the peanuts grown by the Caiabí people who live on the Ilha Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The peanut crop is very important for them and they cultivate diverse types, each one with its own use, name and story. Photo by Fábio de Oliveira Freitas. CAES News
While Americans are familiar with one or two varieties of peanut, farmers in other parts of the world have been able to develop hundreds of varieties thanks to the peanut's natural ability to shuffle its two distinct subgenomes to produce new traits. These are some of the peanuts grown by the Caiabí people who live on the Ilha Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The peanut crop is very important for them and they cultivate diverse types, each one with its own use, name and story. Photo by Fábio de Oliveira Freitas.
Mother of Peanut
Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut’s unlikely and complicated evolution.
Eric Danquah, a plant breeder who founded the West Africa Centre from Crop Improvement at the University of Ghana explains the center's mission at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences International Agriculture Day celebration on April 17, 2019. CAES News
Eric Danquah, a plant breeder who founded the West Africa Centre from Crop Improvement at the University of Ghana explains the center's mission at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences International Agriculture Day celebration on April 17, 2019.
International Ag Celebration
Since its inception in 2007, breeders at the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) in Ghana have produced 23 new varieties of corn, seven new varieties of peanuts, 11 new varieties of rice and seven new varieties of sweet potato.
UGA scientists and members of various commodity commissions met with FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr and Reps. Buddy Carter and Austin Scott at UGA-Tifton on April 17 to discuss broadband internet access for rural farmers. CAES News
UGA scientists and members of various commodity commissions met with FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr and Reps. Buddy Carter and Austin Scott at UGA-Tifton on April 17 to discuss broadband internet access for rural farmers.
Expanding Broadband
Georgia farmers have technological advancements at their fingertips but many are not able to use them to their fullest extent due to the lack of broadband internet access, according to Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist.
The crowd listens during the 2018 turf conference at the UGA Tifton campus. The 73rd annual Southeastern Turfgrass Conference is set for April 25 at UGA-Tifton. CAES News
The crowd listens during the 2018 turf conference at the UGA Tifton campus. The 73rd annual Southeastern Turfgrass Conference is set for April 25 at UGA-Tifton.
Turfgrass Conference
The 73rd annual Southeastern Turfgrass Conference will be held on Thursday, April 25, at the University of Georgia Tifton campus.
Anthony Flint, Julie Peters and Gary Ware were honored as the UGA Griffin campus 2019 Classified Employees of the Year during the annual Classified Employee Recognition Ceremony held March 26. Pictured (from left) during the awards ceremony are Lew Hunnicutt, assistant provost and director at UGA-Griffin, Ware, Peters, Flint and Sam Pardue, dean and director of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Anthony Flint, Julie Peters and Gary Ware were honored as the UGA Griffin campus 2019 Classified Employees of the Year during the annual Classified Employee Recognition Ceremony held March 26. Pictured (from left) during the awards ceremony are Lew Hunnicutt, assistant provost and director at UGA-Griffin, Ware, Peters, Flint and Sam Pardue, dean and director of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Griffin's Best
Anthony Flint, Julie Peters and Gary Ware were honored as the University of Georgia Griffin campus 2019 Classified Employees of the Year during the annual Classified Employee Recognition Ceremony held March 26.
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year. CAES News
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year.
No More Frost
Georgians may be wondering if the state’s last frost of the year has already passed. The answer, of course, depends on where you live and the quirks of the weather.
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. CAES News
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Undergraduate Research
On April 3, almost 70 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students presented their research in the annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium.