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Leyland cypress trees grow as a property border in a lawn in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Leyland cypress trees grow as a property border in a lawn in Butts Co., Ga.
New Plants
Now is the best time of the year to install new trees, shrubs and perennial plants. Although cold weather won’t allow the aboveground parts to grow much, the roots will continue to grow and expand, allowing the plant to become established. By next summer, these trees and plants will be able to tolerate the intense heat and dry conditions.
The blooms of the 'Kanjiro' camellia bring in an assortment of pollinators. CAES News
The blooms of the 'Kanjiro' camellia bring in an assortment of pollinators.
'Kanjiro' Camellia
In Japanese, the word “kanjiro” means “you must feel.” I’m not sure if that means “to touch” or “to experience,” but the ‘Kanjiro’ camellia is certainly one to experience. The ‘Kanjiro’ camellia is known botanically as “Camellia hiemalis” and debuted in 1954. The longevity of this camellia cultivar, which is entering its 64th year, is a testament to both its character and performance in the landscape.
Though the leaves haven't fallen, this Finch Gold possumhaw holly is already showing out with branches filled with golden berries. CAES News
Though the leaves haven't fallen, this Finch Gold possumhaw holly is already showing out with branches filled with golden berries.
Golden Berry
This time of the year, everyone is thinking of decking the halls with hollies and their colorful red berries, but you just may want to consider adding a touch of gold. Can you even imagine hollies with bright golden berries? These would show out in the landscape like small trees or shrubs adorned with a thousand little golden lights — and the same for the mantel! My preference, however, would be to see birds celebrating with a Christmas feast.
A crowd gathers at a past Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm. This year's tour, which is free and open to the public, will be Oct. 6. CAES News
A crowd gathers at a past Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm. This year's tour, which is free and open to the public, will be Oct. 6.
Horticulture Field Day
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Department of Horticulture will host Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA’s Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 6.
CAES News
Freeze-Damaged Landscapes
Georgians have gotten through another late winter freeze. Now it’s time to figure out which plants were damaged in the home landscape.
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture. CAES News
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture.
Hometown Tea
Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby.
In the spring, crape myrtles add color with flowers. In the fall, they add color with brightly colored leaves. CAES News
In the spring, crape myrtles add color with flowers. In the fall, they add color with brightly colored leaves.
Winter Pruning
The calendar says January, but the weather for the last few weeks has been screaming March. The unseasonable warmth means a lot of folks are getting in their yards, looking for something to keep them outdoors a little longer. It’s the perfect time to prune summer-blooming shrubs and trees like crape myrtles and tea olives.
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer. CAES News
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer.
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of those plants become Classic City Garden Award winners.
University of Georgia horticulturist Carol Robacker has released 'Raspberry Profusion,' a cultivar that blooms heavily from May to September. Its raspberry-colored sepals, wonderful fragrance and foliage is more spectacular than older varieties. CAES News
University of Georgia horticulturist Carol Robacker has released 'Raspberry Profusion,' a cultivar that blooms heavily from May to September. Its raspberry-colored sepals, wonderful fragrance and foliage is more spectacular than older varieties.
Foundation Plants
What makes a good foundation plant for your home landscape? Any plant that can tolerate extreme heat, highly compact soil and a highly alkaline soil pH is a good candidate.
Crotons are the perfect choice for fall decoration, especially when partnered with Belgian mums. CAES News
Crotons are the perfect choice for fall decoration, especially when partnered with Belgian mums.
Tropical Autumn Shrub
For the amount of impact they give, crotons are certainly a good investment for home landscapes. Depending on the size you buy, they will reach 2 feet tall and perhaps a little wider. The heat and humidity prevalent in much of Georgia create the perfect conditions to allow crotons to thrive. Wherever I look, whether grown with elephant ears, hibiscus or the Hawaiian ti plant, crotons look festive and tropical.