Menu

Browse Weather Stories

290 results found for Weather
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Emergency Food
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. CAES News
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options.
Solar Workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a new seminar, “Solar Energy in Rural Georgia: Opportunities for Landowners,” on Thursday, March 26 at the UGA-Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Record Rainfall
Bright green grass across the fields, lawns and roadsides of northern and central Georgia is making those parts of the state look more like Ireland than a typical Georgia in February. Copious rain, coupled with periods of much warmer-than-normal temperatures, is waking up plants early and causing them to green up.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.
Terrell County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Seth McAllister sorts peanuts out on a maturity board during the Georgia Peanut Tour on Sept. 19, 2019. CAES News
Terrell County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Seth McAllister sorts peanuts out on a maturity board during the Georgia Peanut Tour on Sept. 19, 2019.
Peanut Crop
Georgia’s recent hot, dry weather has dryland peanut farmers making tough decisions about when to dig their crops, according to Scott Monfort, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Emergency Food
As Hurricane Dorian heads toward the continental U.S., Georgians are reminded of the arrival of a season that isn’t celebrated – hurricane season. Georgians typically flock to the grocery stores and stock up on bread, milk and bottled water. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers a broader list of items to have on hand no matter what emergency threatens to arrive.
UGA Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort estimates that Georgia’s peanut crop hasn’t been this dry this late in the growing season since 2014. Since approximately half of the state’s crop is planted in dryland fields, yields this year are expected to drop. CAES News
UGA Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort estimates that Georgia’s peanut crop hasn’t been this dry this late in the growing season since 2014. Since approximately half of the state’s crop is planted in dryland fields, yields this year are expected to drop.
Summer Drought
Current drought conditions could negatively influence Georgia peanut farmers’ plans for this year’s dryland crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.
The Georgia Peanut Achievement Club honors farmers throughout the state who produced the highest yields. Pictured are the farmers, industry sponsors, UGA Peanut Team and Extension agents on August 10, 2019. CAES News
The Georgia Peanut Achievement Club honors farmers throughout the state who produced the highest yields. Pictured are the farmers, industry sponsors, UGA Peanut Team and Extension agents on August 10, 2019.
Peanut Achievement Club
The University of Georgia Peanut Team honored Georgia’s top peanut producers this weekend at the annual Georgia Peanut Achievement Club meeting held on Jekyll Island, Georgia.
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter.
Peachy Crop
Georgia peach farmers are feeling “peachy” about the outlook for this season’s crop, which is expected to more than double last year’s volume, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Peach and Taylor counties.
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure. CAES News
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure.
Sunscalding
Even with the welcomed rain Georgia farmers experienced this week, sunscalding on certain fruits and vegetables remains a concern as producers continue with this year’s harvest, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.