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Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die. CAES News
Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die.
Black Shank Disease
While most Georgia crops are suffering from the recent lack of rainfall across the state, tobacco farmers have some reason to celebrate. Three consecutive weeks of dry weather in May have curbed incidences of black shank disease, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension tobacco agronomist J. Michael Moore.
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light.
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.
Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops. CAES News
Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops.
Warming weather
Georgia temperatures are rising, and the weather is only going to get hotter with little rain in the forecast. That’s not good news for Georgia’s cotton producers who are in the middle of planting this year’s crop, says Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist.
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program. CAES News
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program.
April Climate
Farmers in the southern half of Georgia benefited from drier conditions this April, while producers in the soggy northern half of the state are still working to prepare fields for spring planting.
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo. CAES News
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo.
Planting Conditions
Georgia farmers should expect dry weather when they plant their crops this spring, but Pam Knox, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences agricultural climatologist, anticipates an active tropical storm season in the Atlantic Ocean this summer.
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia. CAES News
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia.
Native Azaleas
Georgians are accustomed to evergreen azaleas, but native azaleas are currently growing in popularity. Unlike evergreen azaleas, native azaleas lose their leaves in the fall, grow tall and airy rather than low and dense, and bloom in the spring and summer.
October 2017 was marked by rains brought by Hurricane Nate at the beginning of the month and drier conditions as the month continued. CAES News
October 2017 was marked by rains brought by Hurricane Nate at the beginning of the month and drier conditions as the month continued.
October Climate
If this October’s temperatures didn’t have you craving pumpkin spice, you’re not alone. The entire state was about four degrees warmer than normal this year. While the dry, warm weather may have made it hard to celebrate the beginning of fall, it was great for Georgia agriculture, aiding in the harvest of cotton, peanuts and soybeans across the state.
The majority of Georgia received about one inch less rain than normal during July 2017. CAES News
The majority of Georgia received about one inch less rain than normal during July 2017.
Return to Summer
After a month of below-normal temperatures, Georgia’s summer temperatures returned in July. Most of the state, except for the southeastern counties, was warmer and drier than normal, but climatologists don’t believe a drought is likely to develop over the next three months.
Much of Georgia received 1 to 6 inches more rain than usual during this rainy May. CAES News
Much of Georgia received 1 to 6 inches more rain than usual during this rainy May.
May Showers
May’s warm, wet conditions brought relief to the parched areas of the state, and Georgians can expect more of the same in June.
Rainfall in Georgia during April was highly varied. Some southern parts of the state received 2-3 inches less rain than normal, while parts of north Georgia received as many as 4 inches above normal. CAES News
Rainfall in Georgia during April was highly varied. Some southern parts of the state received 2-3 inches less rain than normal, while parts of north Georgia received as many as 4 inches above normal.
Record Highs
April brought plentiful spring showers to north Georgia but little rainfall to the southern half of the state, resulting in moderate drought conditions, delayed planting, and conditions conducive to wildfires near the Okefenokee Swamp.