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CAES News
CSSA Fellow
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA).
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program. CAES News
A Tractors 101 workshop will be held in Tifton, Georgia, hosted by UGA's Farm Again program.
April Climate
Farmers in the southern half of Georgia benefited from drier conditions this April, while producers in the soggy northern half of the state are still working to prepare fields for spring planting.
A group of black flies CAES News
A group of black flies
Black Flies
One of the best things about living above the fall line in Georgia has always been the lack of gnat swarms, but that seems to have changed this spring.
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year. CAES News
UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox says that weather models predict that most Georgians have already seen their last frost of the year.
No More Frost
Georgians may be wondering if the state’s last frost of the year has already passed. The answer, of course, depends on where you live and the quirks of the weather.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Rainfall during August was heavier than normal over the western half of the state and lighter over the eastern half. CAES News
Rainfall during August was heavier than normal over the western half of the state and lighter over the eastern half.
August Weather
Heavy rainfall across the western half of Georgia helped to keep daytime temperatures low, while nighttime temperatures were a little above normal throughout August. 
Temperatures across Georgia returned to normal in July; monthly average temperatures were within one degree of normal across the state. CAES News
Temperatures across Georgia returned to normal in July; monthly average temperatures were within one degree of normal across the state.
Hot and Humid
July saw the return of normal summertime temperatures to Georgia, but those normal summertime temperatures are still punishingly hot.
Thunderstorms scattered across the state in June left some parts of Georgia with more than 7 inches more rain than normal, while other parts of the state saw below-normal rainfall. CAES News
Thunderstorms scattered across the state in June left some parts of Georgia with more than 7 inches more rain than normal, while other parts of the state saw below-normal rainfall.
June Climate
Fueled by warmer-than-normal temperatures, summer thunderstorms blanketed the state this June, producing heavy rain and flooding in some areas while leaving other areas dry.
Did you know that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a library of information on how to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and household emergencies? From packing an emergency preparedness kit to rehabbing a water logged landscape, Georgians can find the emergency information they need by visiting extension.uga.edu/topic-areas/timely-topics/emergencies.html . CAES News
Did you know that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a library of information on how to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and household emergencies? From packing an emergency preparedness kit to rehabbing a water logged landscape, Georgians can find the emergency information they need by visiting extension.uga.edu/topic-areas/timely-topics/emergencies.html .
Tropical Warnings
Longtime residents of Georgia may remember the devastating floods of Tropical Storm Alberto in July 1994. The rain was so intense that Georgia’s one-day rainfall record was set during that storm: 21.10 inches of rain was recorded in Americus, Georgia, over a 24-hour period ending on July 6, 1994, as the storm stalled over the state. Despite that incredible record and the resulting damage, the National Hurricane Center did not retire that storm’s name. “Alberto” is the first on the list of Atlantic tropical storm names for the 2018 season, which begins on June 1.
Temperatures in April were about 2 to 4 degrees below normal across the state. CAES News
Temperatures in April were about 2 to 4 degrees below normal across the state.
Cool Spring
Going into the start of the growing season, a wetter, cooler-than-normal April helped to reduce drought conditions across the northern three-quarters of Georgia, but drought conditions remain in the southeastern corner of the state.