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528 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Water Summits
Water summits in Tifton, Georgia, this week and across the U.S. provide fruit and vegetable growers with an opportunity to discuss water use on farms and simplification of existing water regulation standards with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials.
UGA Entomology Professor Glen Rains demonstrates sprayer calibration during UGA's Integrated Pest Management Field Day in Alma, Georgia. CAES News
UGA Entomology Professor Glen Rains demonstrates sprayer calibration during UGA's Integrated Pest Management Field Day in Alma, Georgia.
Blueberry Pest Field Day
With spring approaching, blueberry farmers focus on maximizing their 2018 yields, which means finding new ways to deal with pests like gall midge and spotted wing drosophila. To help these growers stay on top of potential pest problems, University of Georgia integrated pest management (IPM) researchers hosted a spring field day in Alma, Georgia, on Feb 21. Over 70 regional farmers from several southwestern Georgia counties, such as Bacon, Clinch, Appling and Pierce, attended the half-day event.
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree.
Pecan Tree Management
Pecan season may be over, but Georgia’s producers should continue to scout for pests, like the Asian ambrosia beetle, that could impact future crops.
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013.
Pest Management Field Day
Specialists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will lead a blueberry-centric integrated pest management (IPM) field day on Wednesday, Feb. 21 in Alma, Georgia.
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio. CAES News
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio.
Cowpea Curculio
Once a top agricultural commodity in Georgia, the Southern pea’s presence in the state is now minimal. Growers are reluctant to plant the crop due to a tiny weevil, the cowpea curculio.
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry. CAES News
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry.
Blueberry Disease
The key to managing Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease in blueberries, which makes the fruit unmarketable, is one application of lime sulfur approximately two weeks prior to bud break, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
Lenny Wells conducts a pecan pruning clinic in Wilcox County on Jan. 31, 2018. CAES News
Lenny Wells conducts a pecan pruning clinic in Wilcox County on Jan. 31, 2018.
Pecan Pruning
Pruning young pecan trees is a necessity and, if done properly, can save farmers the hassle of pruning older, much larger trees, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo. CAES News
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo.
Peach Crop
Georgia is due for another blast of arctic air this week and, while Georgians themselves might be groaning about the cold weather, it’s beneficial for the state’s peach crop. These chilly days provide the cold temperatures that Georgia’s fruit crops need for healthy production this summer.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whitefly Management
University of Georgia entomologists advise farmers to kill crops capable of hosting whiteflies after the crop is harvested a final time. Crops left in the field could continue to serve as hosts.
Spotted wing drosophila on a blueberry. CAES News
Spotted wing drosophila on a blueberry.
Spotted wing drosophila
University of Georgia entomologist Ashfaq Sial advises Georgia blueberry farmers to manage the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), the crop’s most destructive pest, by incorporating cultural practices into farming.