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422 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree.
Pecan Tree Management
Pecan season may be over, but Georgia’s producers should continue to scout for pests, like the Asian ambrosia beetle, that could impact future crops.
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state. CAES News
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
Research Assistant Dean
Beginning March 1, Robert N. Stougaard will be the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He will be responsible for the overall supervision of the college’s seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio. CAES News
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio.
Cowpea Curculio
Once a top agricultural commodity in Georgia, the Southern pea’s presence in the state is now minimal. Growers are reluctant to plant the crop due to a tiny weevil, the cowpea curculio.
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry. CAES News
Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease on blueberry.
Blueberry Disease
The key to managing Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease in blueberries, which makes the fruit unmarketable, is one application of lime sulfur approximately two weeks prior to bud break, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
Bottles of pesticides line the shelves of a home improvement store in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Bottles of pesticides line the shelves of a home improvement store in Griffin, Georgia.
Pesticide Safety
Hundreds of people get sick each year from inappropriate pesticide use, but those who don’t deal with pesticides daily may not think about it very often. Of the 11 states participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) pesticide safety program, workers reported 853 serious injuries from pesticides in 2011, according to the CDC.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whitefly Management
University of Georgia entomologists advise farmers to kill crops capable of hosting whiteflies after the crop is harvested a final time. Crops left in the field could continue to serve as hosts.
Spotted wing drosophila on a blueberry. CAES News
Spotted wing drosophila on a blueberry.
Spotted wing drosophila
University of Georgia entomologist Ashfaq Sial advises Georgia blueberry farmers to manage the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), the crop’s most destructive pest, by incorporating cultural practices into farming.
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo.
Pesticide Drift
No official pesticide drift complaints have been reported to the Georgia Department of Agriculture this year due to in-season applications of dicamba, or 2,4-D.
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed. CAES News
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed.
Aspergillus Crown Rot
Aspergillus crown rot disease is on the rise in Georgia peanut fields and University of Georgia researchers are working to pinpoint why. At present, university scientists recommend that farmers encountering this problem in their fields stop saving seed from year to year in an effort to reduce the disease while better control methods are found. The first line of defense has been fungicide application either in furrow or directly to the seed.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo.
Blueberry Production
Nematode control is one of the costliest hurdles to blueberry production on replanted sites. Through research trials in Appling County, Georgia, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Shane Curry found that adding pine bark mulch when replanting blueberry fields helps to combat the pests.