Menu

Browse Weeds, Diseases and Pests Stories

405 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood.
Invasive Species
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus.
Watermelon Diseases
June’s rainfall increased the potential for diseases to strike south Georgia watermelon fields, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here.
Think Ahead
Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little says the secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton being harvested.
Cotton Diseases
In addition to root-knot nematodes and target spot disease, Georgia cotton farmers should be prepared to fight bacterial blight, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
A row of pines at the Westbrook Research Farm on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
A row of pines at the Westbrook Research Farm on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.
Forest Herbicide Workshop
Foresters, forest herbicide applicators, land managers and landowners interested in maintaining effective forest herbicide programs are encouraged to attend the University of Georgia Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources’ Forest Herbicide Workshop. The workshop will be held on Tuesday, July 18, and Wednesday, July 19, at the Tift County UGA Cooperative Extension office.
Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that can considerably damage a watermelon crop. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether fusarium wilt can be managed through fumigation. CAES News
Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that can considerably damage a watermelon crop. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether fusarium wilt can be managed through fumigation.
Fusarium Wilt
Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation.
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia. CAES News
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia.
Black Shank Disease
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia.
Squash Struggles
Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases. CAES News
University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases.
Winter Squash
By determining the varieties best suited for the area, University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash. He has found that Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins, as well as Choctaw and 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato squashes, hold up best against squash pests and diseases.
Layby equipment being used in corn. CAES News
Layby equipment being used in corn.
Layby Herbicide Program
Layby herbicide programs allow Georgia field corn growers to better control weeds throughout the growing season, according to Brooke Jeffries, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Wheeler County, Georgia.