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CAES News
Smoke Danger
Since April 6, when lightning started a wildfire in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, thousands of area families have evacuated their homes to protect themselves from the fire.
Terri Carter, a UGA Extension Family and Consumer Sciences county program assistant in Cobb County, Georgia, has found a unique way to teach nutrition and a history lesson at the same time. Carter's love of the South and her heritage led her to develop the “Food History of the South” program. She concludes her program by sharing healthy adaptations to traditional recipes like black-eyed peas and collard greens. She hopes her clients will think about those who introduced these foods to the South when they cook and serve a traditional Southern meal. CAES News
Terri Carter, a UGA Extension Family and Consumer Sciences county program assistant in Cobb County, Georgia, has found a unique way to teach nutrition and a history lesson at the same time. Carter's love of the South and her heritage led her to develop the “Food History of the South” program. She concludes her program by sharing healthy adaptations to traditional recipes like black-eyed peas and collard greens. She hopes her clients will think about those who introduced these foods to the South when they cook and serve a traditional Southern meal.
Food History of the South
In Cobb County, Georgia, Terri Carter’s job with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is to educate residents on proper nutrition. As a self-declared “proud woman of the South,” Carter, a UGA Extension Family and Consumer Sciences county program assistant, has found a unique way to teach nutrition and a history lesson at the same time. Carter’s love of the South and her heritage led her to develop the “Food History of the South” program.
Sylvia McDaniel displays a food journal poster she created after attending a University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) class. UGA Cooperative Extension program assistants and agents deliver the free nutrition education classes to Georgia residents in communities across the state. CAES News
Sylvia McDaniel displays a food journal poster she created after attending a University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) class. UGA Cooperative Extension program assistants and agents deliver the free nutrition education classes to Georgia residents in communities across the state.
SNAP-Ed Program
Georgia consistently ranks “poorly in obesity and chronic disease statistics,” and a large segment of the population struggles to put food on their tables, says the leader of UGA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance program. The program works to reverse the trend of obesity and chronic disease through a combination of in-person and online nutrition education classes, lessons to help early childhood educators provide healthier environments for students, and the promotion of healthy nutrition and behaviors through social marketing.
CAES News
Mall Walking
It’s cold outside, and it’s much easier this time of year to sit inside on a frigid, blustery day and read a book under a blanket while sipping a mug of tea. It’s often difficult for us to find the motivation we had on Jan. 1 to exercise and get fit.
Kylie Jordan, a sixth-grader from Morrow, Georgia, won first place in Georgia's Radon Poster Contest for her poster of a sci-fi-inspired radon cloud hovering over a neighborhood. CAES News
Kylie Jordan, a sixth-grader from Morrow, Georgia, won first place in Georgia's Radon Poster Contest for her poster of a sci-fi-inspired radon cloud hovering over a neighborhood.
Radon Poster Winners
Three Georgia middle school students will meet Gov. Nathan Deal later this month in recognition of their work to alert Georgians to the dangers of radon.  
It took author Ina Cook Hopkins more than nine years to compile data, interview key players, write the text and work with designer Carol Williamson to complete a history book about Rock Eagle 4-H Center. A former Walton County 4-H'er, Hopkins refers to the book as her last 4-H record book and a “tangible way to give back to the organization that means so much” to her. She is pictured (seated) with the book's designer, Carol Williamson (standing left), and Georgia 4-H State Leader Arch Smith. CAES News
It took author Ina Cook Hopkins more than nine years to compile data, interview key players, write the text and work with designer Carol Williamson to complete a history book about Rock Eagle 4-H Center. A former Walton County 4-H'er, Hopkins refers to the book as her last 4-H record book and a “tangible way to give back to the organization that means so much” to her. She is pictured (seated) with the book's designer, Carol Williamson (standing left), and Georgia 4-H State Leader Arch Smith.
Rock Eagle History
A newly published history of Rock Eagle 4-H Center, “Rock Eagle: Centerpiece of Georgia 4-H,” details how the camp grew into a place where millions of past Georgia 4-H’ers and unknown numbers of future 4-H members create lifelong memories.
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water.
Healthy Resolutions
The calendar has rolled over, so what better time than the present to start setting some new nutrition goals for 2017?
CAES News
Obesity Prevention
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has been instrumental in helping two Georgia counties secure funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to combat obesity.
A medicine cabinet filled with medicine and personal hygiene items. CAES News
A medicine cabinet filled with medicine and personal hygiene items.
Organization Time
January signals the beginning of a new year and provides a natural opportunity to accomplish several crucial organizational tasks. Eliminate clutter in your home by discarding or donating unused items.
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant. CAES News
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant.
Finger Millet
Relatively unknown outside of health food stores in the United States, millet has served as a staple food for families in Eastern Africa and Asia for thousands of years.