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Members of the research team prepare to test multispectral, hyperspectral and thermal cameras that will record data on plant characteristics last summer at the Iron Horse Plant Sciences Farm near Athens. The tractor used for preliminary testing will be replaced by all-terrain robots and unmanned aerial vehicles during the growing season this spring and summer. CAES News
Members of the research team prepare to test multispectral, hyperspectral and thermal cameras that will record data on plant characteristics last summer at the Iron Horse Plant Sciences Farm near Athens. The tractor used for preliminary testing will be replaced by all-terrain robots and unmanned aerial vehicles during the growing season this spring and summer.
Crop Robots
It may be a while before robots and drones are as common as tractors and combine harvesters on farms, but high-tech tools may soon play a major role in helping feed the world’s rapidly growing population.
Peng Chee is a cotton breeder on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Peng Chee is a cotton breeder on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cotton Breeding
UGA cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It has also garnered Chee national recognition.
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9. CAES News
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9.
Organics Conference
More than 1,000 farmers, gardeners, health advocates and organic food lovers are expected to attend the 2017 Georgia Organics Conference and Expo. This year’s schedule includes farm tours, 10 in-depth workshops, 32 educational sessions, three daylong intensive workshops, two keynote addresses, one-on-one consulting sessions and a trade show. Registration ends on Monday, Feb. 6, for this year’s conference. The two-day annual event, one of the largest sustainable agriculture expos in the South, is set for Feb. 17-18 at the Georgia International Convention Center in Atlanta.
A damaged irrigation pivot in Thomas County, Georgia. Credit: Jim Rayburn CAES News
A damaged irrigation pivot in Thomas County, Georgia. Credit: Jim Rayburn
Storm Damage
Deadly storms that ravaged much of south Georgia Jan. 20-22 also damaged or destroyed many irrigation pivots that supply needed water to agricultural crops.
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau. CAES News
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau.
2017 Ag Forecast
In 2017, Georgia row crop farmers will likely devote more acreage to the state’s tried-and-true commodities: cotton and peanuts. This and other agricultural projections for the year were the focus of the 10th annual Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series, held across the state Jan. 18-27.
Corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia.
Conservation Tillage Conference
For decades, farmers who have embraced conservation production have seen increased soil health, reduced irrigation demands and lowered economic risk. For the past 17 years, Georgia farmers interested in adopting new conservation practices for their farms – including those looking to swap best practices with other conservation tillers – have gathered at Georgia’s annual Conservation Production Systems Training Conference.
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant. CAES News
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant.
Finger Millet
Relatively unknown outside of health food stores in the United States, millet has served as a staple food for families in Eastern Africa and Asia for thousands of years.
The ‘Avalon’ pecan, compared here to two other varieties, is a highly desired cultivar due to its extreme resistance to scab disease. CAES News
The ‘Avalon’ pecan, compared here to two other varieties, is a highly desired cultivar due to its extreme resistance to scab disease.
Avalon Variety
The University of Georgia’s newest pecan variety will be released next spring and has shown good resistance against scab disease so far, according to Patrick Conner, a horticultural scientist at the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton being harvested.
Farm Gate Value
Thanks to dwindling commodity prices during 2015, Georgia farmers’ produce and livestock were worth about $151 million less in 2015 than they were the previous year.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016.
Greenhouses and High Tunnels
From the miracle of December tomatoes to the marvel of fresh salad greens in space, greenhouses and growth chambers may play an increasing role in creating hyperlocal or hyperportable food systems.