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410 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease. CAES News
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease.
Watermelon Research
Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017.
Peanut Rotations
Farmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia.
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecan Trees
Dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides, sprayed directly on trees at full rates, kill the plant material they touch, but they don’t travel through the tree or linger from year to year, according to a newly released University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan study. The study also found that drift from the herbicides does not hurt the trees.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth.
Nematodes
Mother Nature’s freezing January temperatures reduced nematode buildup in southern Georgia fields. But warmer temperatures this spring could spark nematode activity, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep. CAES News
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep.
Rabbit control
Rabbits are often welcomed additions to lawns because many homeowners find them adorable. They love to see rabbits at the edges of their lawns early in the morning or in the evening. However, if the population is left unchecked, rabbits can cost homeowners hundreds, even thousands, of dollars a year in damages.
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia. CAES News
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia.
Native Azaleas
Georgians are accustomed to evergreen azaleas, but native azaleas are currently growing in popularity. Unlike evergreen azaleas, native azaleas lose their leaves in the fall, grow tall and airy rather than low and dense, and bloom in the spring and summer.
Agents use the home and garden edition of the 2018 Georgia Pest Management Handbook to give control recommendations. Both the home and garden and commercial editions of the handbook provide current information on selection, application and safe use of pest control chemicals. CAES News
Agents use the home and garden edition of the 2018 Georgia Pest Management Handbook to give control recommendations. Both the home and garden and commercial editions of the handbook provide current information on selection, application and safe use of pest control chemicals.
Pesticide Use
Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and more, can contain organic or conventional ingredients. People use them in homes and workplaces, on farms and in gardens, and in other places where they want to control pests like weeds, insects, fungi, rodents and plant viruses.
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree.
Pecan Tree Management
Pecan season may be over, but Georgia’s producers should continue to scout for pests, like the Asian ambrosia beetle, that could impact future crops.
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state. CAES News
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
Research Assistant Dean
Beginning March 1, Robert N. Stougaard will be the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He will be responsible for the overall supervision of the college’s seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.