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Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo.
Late-Planted Cotton
If Georgia farmers plan to plant cotton, they need to do so as soon as possible. Only 86 percent of the state’s crop has been planted as of June 10, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Progress and Condition Report for Georgia.
Ideally, grass clippings should be recycled into the grass. If a large amount of clippings remain, bagging is the best option. CAES News
Ideally, grass clippings should be recycled into the grass. If a large amount of clippings remain, bagging is the best option.
Messy Lawns
After weeks of rainfall, lawns grew and now mowing may leave a significant volume of clippings behind. If there's too much to rake into the canopy, the clippings should be removed. 
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whitefly Update
Silverleaf whiteflies devastated Georgia’s cotton and fall vegetable crops last year. In response to this crisis, a team of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists is studying the pests statewide to help cotton and vegetable farmers avoid another year of disappointing crops.
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018 CAES News
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018
Rainy Impact
Two consecutive weeks of rainfall in Georgia stunted the growth of the state’s peanut crop and created ideal conditions for diseases in vegetable fields, leaving farmers scrambling to decide what to do next.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting. CAES News
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting.
Scouting Schools
Two insect scouting schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in June, will introduce new scouts to insect monitoring and serve as a review for experienced scouts and farmers.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
Peanut Planting Time
Now is the peak time to plant peanuts in Georgia, according to Cristiane Pilon, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut physiologist.
Cotton plants blown over from Tropical Storm Irma's winds on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Cotton plants blown over from Tropical Storm Irma's winds on the UGA Tifton campus.
Cotton Crop
Researchers project that Georgia’s cotton farmers will plant more than 1.45 million acres this year, an increase from 1.28 million acres in 2017, according to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017.
Peanut Rotations
Farmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts.
Switchgrass CAES News
Switchgrass
Biofuel Crops
A research team led by the University of Georgia has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels.
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments. CAES News
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments.
Paul Raymer
More than 40 years ago, a young man from Arkansas decided to become an agriculture major because "it was the beginning of the Green Revolution, and agriculture had a bright future." Today that man, University of Georgia professor Paul Raymer, has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder.