Menu

Browse Health Stories

134 results found for Health
National 2017 4-H Youth in Action Citizenship winner Amelia Day is a recent high school graduate from Fort Valley, Georgia. As a Georgia 4-H member, she created Operation: Veteran Smiles, a project that provides care packages to veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. CAES News
National 2017 4-H Youth in Action Citizenship winner Amelia Day is a recent high school graduate from Fort Valley, Georgia. As a Georgia 4-H member, she created Operation: Veteran Smiles, a project that provides care packages to veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals.
4-H Week
Six million students across America participate in 4-H and, of those, more than 170,000 call Georgia home. To raise awareness of the state’s largest youth development organization, the week of Oct. 1-7 has been declared National 4-H Week.
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells. CAES News
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells.
New Stroke Model
It is well-known in the medical field that the pig brain shares certain physiological and anatomical similarities with the human brain. So similar are the two that researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed the first U.S. pig model for stroke treatments...
A $20 million National Science Foundation grant funds the Engineering Research Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies (CMaT). The consortium is designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer. CAES News
A $20 million National Science Foundation grant funds the Engineering Research Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies (CMaT). The consortium is designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.
CMaT Formed
Steven Stice to lead University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center researchers in consortium designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F. CAES News
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F.
Grilling Safety
It’s football season, and tailgating before a game is a traditional part of the experience. Unfortunately, grilling your favorite cut of beef means increasing the potential for foodborne illness due to improper handling of food. These reminders from the University of Georgia Meat Science and Technology Center will provide you with grilling skills to keep foodborne illness far from your fall tailgating get-togethers.
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI. CAES News
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI.
'Brain Glue'
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed Brain Glue, a substance that could one day serve as a treatment for traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs. 
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes.
Drink Water
Did you know that a 10-percent weight loss due to dehydration can make you disoriented and weak and can cause a potential heat stroke? As the hot Georgia summer continues and fall sports and activities begin, it is essential that you stay hydrated. UGA Extension experts say water is still the best choice for doing so.
Technology gifts are on the top of many Christmas lists. If your child received one this holiday, University of Georgia Extension specialists say to review the apps on the device and police any new ones downloaded to the device to ensure that they are appropriate for children. CAES News
Technology gifts are on the top of many Christmas lists. If your child received one this holiday, University of Georgia Extension specialists say to review the apps on the device and police any new ones downloaded to the device to ensure that they are appropriate for children.
Screen Time
Babysitters are no strangers to learning nap time, homework time and meal time quirks. As children gain more access to technology, parents should also share their screen time expectations with babysitters.
No one should look directly at the sun — even during the eclipse on August 21 — without eclipse glasses from a reputable source. A list of reputable sources is available at NASA.gov. CAES News
No one should look directly at the sun — even during the eclipse on August 21 — without eclipse glasses from a reputable source. A list of reputable sources is available at NASA.gov.
Eclipse Safety
On the afternoon of Aug. 21, Georgians will have the opportunity to share in the experience of seeing the summer afternoon sky darken as the moon’s shadow covers the sun, and they are excited.
This month, Michael Doyle retired from his position as director of the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
This month, Michael Doyle retired from his position as director of the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus.
Doyle Retires
Twenty-six years ago, the University of Georgia hired Mike Doyle to create and lead a research center focused on detecting, controlling and eliminating foodborne pathogens in America’s food supply. This month, Doyle retired from his position as director of the world-renowned Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus.
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America. CAES News
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America.
Food Safety Bioinformatics
Food safety research usually involves analyzing live populations of foodborne pathogens like Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli, but University of Georgia food scientist Henk den Bakker fights pathogens by developing computer software.