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Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus.
Pecan Production
Undeterred by the possibility that Georgia pecans might flood the market in six or seven years, the increasing popularity of the crop has University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells encouraged about the future of the state's pecans.
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013.
Farming Economics
Low commodity prices and declining credit availability are impeding cash flow for Georgia farmers, said University of Georgia agricultural economist Brady Brewer. However, there are still options for farmers to sustain their farming operation.
Today's washing machines are a far cry from the one Grandma used. With all the bells, whistles and options, buying a new washing machine, or dryer, can feel like new car shopping. CAES News
Today's washing machines are a far cry from the one Grandma used. With all the bells, whistles and options, buying a new washing machine, or dryer, can feel like new car shopping.
Washing Machines
Thanks to technology and manufacturers’ attempts to please the ever-demanding consumer, washing machines have become more “intelligent” and able to detect soil levels and water needs. Before buying a new one, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension home experts suggest asking yourself a few very important questions.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens.
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.
Mark Abney, UGA Extension peanut entomologist, advocates scouting for insects in peanut fields. CAES News
Mark Abney, UGA Extension peanut entomologist, advocates scouting for insects in peanut fields.
Peanut Insects
University of Georgia entomologist Mark Abney is searching for ways to monitor insects responsible for destroying Georgia peanut crops. This is the first step in developing economic thresholds that will indicate to farmers when it’s time to apply controls for each pest and when it’s time to cut losses.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird.
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Southern Baked Pie Company in Gainesville, accepts her University of Georgia Flavor of Georgia grand prize trophy from Gov. Nathan Deal, UGA College of Agricultural and and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue and Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black Tuesday March 15. CAES News
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Southern Baked Pie Company in Gainesville, accepts her University of Georgia Flavor of Georgia grand prize trophy from Gov. Nathan Deal, UGA College of Agricultural and and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue and Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black Tuesday March 15.
2016 Flavor of Georgia Winners
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Gainseville’s Southern Baked Pie Company, baked her way to the grand prize with her caramel pecan pie in the University of Georgia’s 2016 Flavor of Georgia Contest.
UGA weed scientist Eric Prostko studies sicklepod in a greenhouse on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2015. CAES News
UGA weed scientist Eric Prostko studies sicklepod in a greenhouse on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2015.
Sicklepod Weed
The possibility of sicklepod becoming resistant to herbicides is a potential concern for all Georgia peanut farmers, said Eric Protsko, a weed scientist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Pictured is a cotton plant impacted by thrips damage. CAES News
Pictured is a cotton plant impacted by thrips damage.
Thrips Management
In an effort to combat the threat of thrips infestations in cotton, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton entomologist Phillip Roberts encourages Georgia growers to be proactive with insecticide application in planting this spring. Failure to apply an insecticide treatment at planting leaves cotton plants vulnerable to increased thrips pressure, which could impact growth.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus.
Pecan Workshop
In response to a growing number of pecan acreage across Georgia, the University of Georgia will be hosting a pecan production workshop for farmers just getting into the business. UGA Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells wants to help growers get all of the information they need at the workshop, to be held Monday, April 11.