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405 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio. CAES News
Damage done on Southern pea by cowpea curculio.
Scouting In Vegetables
Georgia vegetable farmers should scout for insects in young lima beans and snap beans now.
Insect scouting is an important part of any vegetable management plan. CAES News
Insect scouting is an important part of any vegetable management plan.
Scouting
Whether you work on a large family farm, in a home vegetable garden, or in a small, community garden vegetable plot, routinely scouting for insects should be an important part of your vegetable-growing plan.
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus.
Watermelon Crop
Georgia watermelon producers are busy guarding their crops against potential disease pressure following last week’s rainfall.
Pepper weevil on a plant. CAES News
Pepper weevil on a plant.
Pepper Weevils
Pepper weevils are such a threat to Georgia’s pepper crop that University of Georgia vegetable entomologist David Riley says Georgia farmers and agricultural workers should immediately kill any weevils found on fruit, equipment or clothes.
Angelita Acebes is the new Extension pecan entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Angelita Acebes is the new Extension pecan entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus.
New Pecan Entomologist
New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects.
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease. CAES News
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease.
Watermelon Research
Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017.
Peanut Rotations
Farmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia.
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecan Trees
Dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides, sprayed directly on trees at full rates, kill the plant material they touch, but they don’t travel through the tree or linger from year to year, according to a newly released University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan study. The study also found that drift from the herbicides does not hurt the trees.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth.
Nematodes
Mother Nature’s freezing January temperatures reduced nematode buildup in southern Georgia fields. But warmer temperatures this spring could spark nematode activity, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.