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Steaks on the grill. CAES News
Steaks on the grill.
Grill Safety
Bacteria love warm environments as much as you enjoy the warm outdoors, and they can turn your perfect holiday weekend cookout into a health nightmare. Food safety is as important when grilling and serving food outdoors as it is in the kitchen because improperly handled food can make you sick.
A cold slice of Georgia-grown watermelon is a natural snack for a hot summer day. University of Georgia food safety specialists say that once a melon is cut, either serve or refrigerate it immediately. The juicy surfaces of cut melons are great places for bacteria to multiply if conditions are warm. CAES News
A cold slice of Georgia-grown watermelon is a natural snack for a hot summer day. University of Georgia food safety specialists say that once a melon is cut, either serve or refrigerate it immediately. The juicy surfaces of cut melons are great places for bacteria to multiply if conditions are warm.
Safer Fruit
Watermelon, cantaloupe and other melons should be thoroughly cleaned and refrigerated after they are cut, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension foods specialist.
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008. CAES News
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008.
Time to Can
Canning season is here and, even if you haven’t harvested your backyard tomatoes or okra yet, it’s time to get ready.
Kisha Faulk tries her first roasted oyster while her coworker Barbara Worley looks on. The two women were among the participants in a recent Ocean to Table workshop designed to increase consumers' and UGA Extension agents' knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood. CAES News
Kisha Faulk tries her first roasted oyster while her coworker Barbara Worley looks on. The two women were among the participants in a recent Ocean to Table workshop designed to increase consumers' and UGA Extension agents' knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood.
Ocean to Table
The brainchild of Chatham County Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Agent Jackie Ogden, the Ocean to Table workshop series is designed to increase consumers’ and UGA Extension agents’ knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood.
If you experience a prolonged power outage, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food at a safe, cold temperature for about four hours if the door remains closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours. A half-full freezer will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door stays closed. CAES News
If you experience a prolonged power outage, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food at a safe, cold temperature for about four hours if the door remains closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours. A half-full freezer will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door stays closed.
Emergency Food Safety
All hands on deck! Stormy weather and hurricanes can blow through with little warning this time of year. Preparation before the storm hits can mean the difference between safe food and water and contaminated supplies that can make you sick.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County.
Mobile Markets
There’s nothing tastier than fresh greens or summer tomatoes from the neighborhood farmers market, but if you can’t make it to a market in metro Atlanta this summer, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has you covered.
CAES News
Clean Eating
Over the past few years, “clean eating” has become a popular way to describe a diet of simple foods, and food manufacturers have taken note. Following consumer demand, food companies have simplified their ingredient lists, introduced clean labeling and started to advertise their products as “clean.”
Lettuce, a high-value cash crop, was among the highest yielding crops in a University of Georgia organic trial incorporating cover crops into a high-intensive crop rotation model at a UGA farm in Watkinsville, GA. The crop yielded a net return of over $9,000 per acre over the three-year study period. CAES News
Lettuce, a high-value cash crop, was among the highest yielding crops in a University of Georgia organic trial incorporating cover crops into a high-intensive crop rotation model at a UGA farm in Watkinsville, GA. The crop yielded a net return of over $9,000 per acre over the three-year study period.
Wash Produce
An outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, has been linked to one death, 52 hospitalizations and 121 case reports in 25 states across the U.S. Judy Harrison, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist, says washing produce won’t guarantee it’s free of pathogens, but it will help.
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008. CAES News
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008.
Canning Tips
Foods produced during their natural growing season often have greater nutritional value, and canning enables consumers to have more control over their food by preserving seasonal produce.
Elizabeth Andress, director of the National Center for Home Food Preservation housed in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, trains UGA Cooperative Extension agents and others on the proper, safe way to can fruits, vegetables and other foods. CAES News
Elizabeth Andress, director of the National Center for Home Food Preservation housed in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, trains UGA Cooperative Extension agents and others on the proper, safe way to can fruits, vegetables and other foods.
Andress Honored
The Georgia Association of Teachers of Family and Consumer Sciences has named Elizabeth Andress, professor of foods and nutrition in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS), the organization’s Postsecondary Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher of the Year.