Menu

Browse Environment Stories

577 results found for Environment
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water. CAES News
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water.
Mold Removal
Following weeks of rain across many parts of the Peach State and more in the forecast, many Georgians find themselves dealing with flooded basements, backed-up septic systems, standing water, mold, mud, mud and more mud.
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. CAES News
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options.
Solar Workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a new seminar, “Solar Energy in Rural Georgia: Opportunities for Landowners,” on Thursday, March 26 at the UGA-Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Record Rainfall
Bright green grass across the fields, lawns and roadsides of northern and central Georgia is making those parts of the state look more like Ireland than a typical Georgia in February. Copious rain, coupled with periods of much warmer-than-normal temperatures, is waking up plants early and causing them to green up.
Decatur County farmer Bobby Barber, Jr., tells local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nan Bostick about the day Hurricane Michael struck his farm. Bostick joined the Extension office last spring says the farmers in her county have shown her that they are resilient, positive, and are going to start over and do everything they can to be even better. "We might be bruised, but we are not broken,” she said. CAES News
Decatur County farmer Bobby Barber, Jr., tells local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nan Bostick about the day Hurricane Michael struck his farm. Bostick joined the Extension office last spring says the farmers in her county have shown her that they are resilient, positive, and are going to start over and do everything they can to be even better. "We might be bruised, but we are not broken,” she said.
Rural Stress
Much like their counterparts across the nation, farmers in Georgia have experienced increased rates of suicide and stress over the last decade. To help curb these statistics, University of Georgia faculty are working to understand the causes of rural stress and to build systems that can help rural communities support community members in crisis.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon.
Radon Action Month
Radon, an odorless, colorless, tasteless, radioactive gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers — and your home is far from immune to it.
Michael Toews, entomology professor and co-director of UGA's Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, and his graduate student team of Apurba Barman (foreground), Lauren Perez (background, left) and Sarah Hobby inspect sorghum plants near Tifton for signs of invasive sugarcane aphids. CAES News
Michael Toews, entomology professor and co-director of UGA's Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, and his graduate student team of Apurba Barman (foreground), Lauren Perez (background, left) and Sarah Hobby inspect sorghum plants near Tifton for signs of invasive sugarcane aphids.
Unwelcome Visitors
Earlier this year, Chuck Bargeron learned how to catch a Burmese python.
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics. CAES News
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics.
Environmental Economics
Despite fears of rising sea levels and violent storms, many people still dream of living on the water. It’s an idyllic life — until it isn’t.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018.
Rural Stress
Farmers are extended family for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents throughout the state, and agents are uniquely positioned to raise awareness about rural stress and mental health concerns for Georgia farmers.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields Down
A year after Hurricane Michael ravaged southwest Georgia, including the region’s pecan industry, farmers still are struggling as they harvest this year’s crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.