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The MyIPM app is a free, mobile tool designed to promote integrated pest management for commercial fruit crop production. The app focuses on fruit crops grown in the Eastern U.S., including apple, blackberry, blueberry, bunch grape, cherry, cranberry, peach, pear and strawberry. CAES News
The MyIPM app is a free, mobile tool designed to promote integrated pest management for commercial fruit crop production. The app focuses on fruit crops grown in the Eastern U.S., including apple, blackberry, blueberry, bunch grape, cherry, cranberry, peach, pear and strawberry.
MyIPM App
The MyIPM app helps fruit growers across the Southeast U.S. manage a multitude of crops with disease and insect diagnostic tools.
Copies of the centennial book, published by UGA-Tifton, are on sale for $33 each. This price covers the cost of the book, along with taxes and shipping. CAES News
Copies of the centennial book, published by UGA-Tifton, are on sale for $33 each. This price covers the cost of the book, along with taxes and shipping.
Centennial History
Before farm-to-table was trendy, scientists and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension personnel in Tifton were taking research from the lab to the farm.
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure. CAES News
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure.
Sunscalding
Even with the welcomed rain Georgia farmers experienced this week, sunscalding on certain fruits and vegetables remains a concern as producers continue with this year’s harvest, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins. CAES News
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins.
Peach Pest
Using horticultural oil sprays as an integrated pest management strategy to control San Jose scale in peach trees can be an effective alternative to chemical applications, and a University of Georgia study finds that the best control comes after trees have been pruned, allowing for lower application rates than previously recommended.
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring. CAES News
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring.
Downy Mildew
Georgia vegetable farmers should be on alert as downy mildew disease has been spotted in at least three southern Georgia counties this spring. Additional counties could follow as weather conditions remain favorable for the disease into early June, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta.
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon) CAES News
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon)
Tomato Pan-genome
 It’s summer, and Georgia gardeners are anxiously awaiting their first tomato harvest. Just in time for those first tomato sandwiches, researchers at the University of Georgia have helped unlock the mystery of what separates today’s tomatoes from their inedible ancestors.
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light.
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia.
Nematode Impact
A recent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension survey of 431 Georgia vegetable fields found that more than 60% contained root-knot nematodes, tiny parasitic worms that feed on roots and destroy plants.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer.
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.